Wiley Blackwell Social and Cultural Histories of the Ancient World: A Social and Cultural History of Late Antiquity

Editor/Author Boin, Douglas
Publication Year: 2018
Publisher: Wiley

Single-User Purchase Price: $104.00
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: $156.00
ISBN: 978-1-11-907700-8
Category: History - History, Ancient
Image Count: 43
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

A Social and Cultural History of Late Antiquity examines the social and cultural landscape of the Late Antique Mediterranean. The text offers a picture of everyday life as it was lived in the spaces around and between two of the most memorable and towering figures of the time -- Constantine and Muhammad.

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Table of Contents

  • Illustrations
  • Boxed Texts
  • Preface: The Magic of History
  • Acknowledgments
  • Annotated List of Abbreviations and a Note on Citations from Secondary Literature
  • Timeline
  • Map: The Late Antique World At‐A‐Glance
  • Part I: The “Vanishing” of Rome
  • 1 Who and What Is Late Antiquity?
  • 1.1 An Overview of the Book
  • 1.2 Three Lives and the “Fall of Rome”
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • 2 When Does Late Antiquity Begin? When Does it End?
  • 2.1 The Third through Fifth Centuries CE: A Narrated Timeline
  • 2.2 A Warning about Periodization
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • 3 How Do We Do Late Antique History?
  • 3.1 Evaluating Sources, Asking Questions
  • 3.2 The Past in the Past
  • 3.3 Acquiring Cultural Competence: The Study of Religion in History
  • 3.4 Linking, not Disconnecting, Different Periods of Early Christianity
  • 3.5 Pre‐Modern vs. Early Modern History: A Note on Sources
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • Part II: Late Antiquity Appears
  • 4 Power
  • 4.1 Third‐Century Politics
  • 4.2 Mithras and a Roman Fascination with the Mysteries of Persia
  • 4.3 The Material Culture of Sasanian Persia
  • 4.4 Rome and Sasanian Persia in Conflict
  • 4.5 The Roman World of the Third Century CE
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • 5 Worship
  • 5.1 The Civic Sacrifice Policy of 250 CE
  • 5.2 How Did Romans Worship Their Gods? Text and Material Culture, c. Third Century CE
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • 6 Social Change
  • 6.1 Rome's Laws Against Christians
  • 6.2 The End of the Third Century and the Rise of the Rule of Four
  • 6.3 A View from Thessaloniki, Roman Greece, Late Third Century CE
  • 6.4 Diocletian's Edict against Followers of Mani, 296 CE or 302 CE
  • 6.5 The Rise of Christianity: Assumptions and Starting Points
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • 7 Law and Politics
  • 7.1 Roman Law: History From the Ground‐Up, Top‐Down, and Sideways
  • 7.2 The “Edict of Milan,” 313 CE
  • 7.3 Individual Laws and the Collection of Legal Texts
  • 7.4 Law and Politics in the Fourth Century CE
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • 8 Urban Life
  • 8.1 Daily Life in the Fourth Century CE and Beyond: Starting Points and Assumptions
  • 8.2 The Archaeology of Rome
  • 8.3 The Archaeology of Constantinople
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • 9 Community
  • 9.1 Mystery Cults
  • 9.2 Christian Communities and Christian Law
  • 9.3 The Jewish Community: Shared Values and Social Diversity
  • 9.4 The Communities of Roman Egypt, Fourth–Fifth Centuries CE
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • 10 Economy
  • 10.1 Egypt beyond Its Borders
  • 10.2 The Arena and Racing Culture
  • 10.3 Economic Realities, Third–Sixth Centuries CE
  • 10.4 The Crypta Balbi Excavations, Rome: The Story of a Social Safety Net, Third Century–Sixth Century CE
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • 11 The Household and Family
  • 11.1 Home as a Place
  • 11.2 House‐Churches in the Long History of Christianity
  • 11.3 Family and Household Relations, c.405–551 CE
  • 11.4 Slaves and Slavery
  • 11.5 Households and the Emergence of the Papacy in Rome
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • 12 Ideas and Literary Culture
  • 12.1 The “One” and the Many: Philosophical and Anthropological Perspectives
  • 12.2 Literature and Ideas after the “Vanishing” of Rome
  • 12.3 The Literary Culture of Justinian's Roman Empire
  • 12.4 Literature as a Source for the Study of Medicine and Disease
  • 12.5 The Rise of a Book Culture
  • 12.6 Latin Poetry and Christian Communities in Rome, c.366–600 CE
  • 12.7 Looking Ahead: “People of the Book”
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • Part III: The Illusion of Mediterranean History
  • 13 Geography and Society
  • 13.1 Seeing the Sixth Century Through the Eyes of an Emperor and a Traveler
  • 13.2 Cosmas’ Christian World
  • 13.3 Beyond Rome's Christian Empire in the Sixth Century CE
  • 13.4 Sixth‐ and Seventh‐Century South Asia
  • 13.5 Sixth‐ and Seventh‐Century China and Central Asia
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • 14 A Choice of Directions
  • 14.1 Jerusalem in the Sixth and Early Seventh Centuries CE
  • 14.2 The Social World of the Arabian Peninsula in the Sixth Century CE
  • 14.3 The Believers Movement
  • Summary
  • Study Questions
  • Suggested Readings
  • Glossary
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