The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea

Editors: Dear, I. C. B and Kemp, Peter
Publication Year: 2016
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Inc.

Price: Core Collection Only
ISBN: 978-0-19-880050-7
Category: Science - Marine sciences
Image Count: 265
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

The most comprehensive and authoritative reference book of its kind, the Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea provides coverage of a huge range of topics, from shipbuilding, yachting, diving, marine engineering, and marine mammals, to smuggling, tsunamis, mermaids, and the language and literature of the sea.

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Table of Contents

  • Acknowledgements
  • A
  • Aaron Manby
  • AB
  • aback
  • abaft
  • abalone
  • abandonment
  • ‘abandon ship’
  • abatement of false lights
  • abeam
  • able seaman
  • aboard
  • about
  • above board
  • abox
  • A-bracket
  • abreast
  • a-burton
  • accommodation
  • accommodation ladder
  • account, to go on the
  • a-cockbill, orig. a-cockbell
  • acorn
  • acrostolium
  • acting
  • active list
  • actuaire
  • actuairole
  • acumba
  • Adams, William (1564–1620)
  • admiral
  • Admiralty
  • Admiralty midshipman
  • adornings
  • adrift
  • advantage
  • adventure
  • advice boat
  • adze, or sometimes spelt addes
  • aerodynamics
  • affreightment, contract of.
  • afloat
  • aft
  • afterbody
  • afterguard
  • afterturn
  • age of the moon
  • aground
  • ahead
  • ‘ahoy!’
  • a-hull, or lying a-hull
  • aircraft carriers
  • Alabama
  • ‘Albany beef’
  • albatross.
  • Albemarle, CSS
  • Aldis lamp
  • a-lee
  • Alfred the Great (848–c.900)
  • Algerine pirates
  • all-a-taunt-o
  • alleyway
  • ‘all hands’
  • all in the wind
  • all standing.
  • aloft
  • aloof
  • alow
  • alternating light
  • altitude
  • amain
  • ambergris
  • America
  • America's Cup
  • amidships
  • amplitude
  • Amundsen, Roald (1872–1928)
  • AMVER or Automated Mutual Assistance Vessel Rescue System
  • anchor.
  • anchorage
  • anchor buoy
  • anchor light
  • anchor warp
  • anchor watch
  • ancient
  • ‘Ancient Mariner, The Rime of the’
  • ‘Andrew’
  • anemometer
  • angary, right of
  • angel-shot
  • angle of cut
  • Anson, Lord George (1697–1762)
  • answering pennant
  • Antarctic Convergence
  • antifouling
  • ‘anti-guggler’
  • anti-rolling devices
  • apeak, orig. apeek
  • apostles
  • apparent wind
  • apron.
  • Argonauts
  • argosy
  • ark
  • arm, to
  • Armada
  • armillary sphere
  • ‘armstrong patent’
  • artemon
  • articles of agreement
  • Articles of War
  • artificial horizon
  • ASDIC
  • ashore
  • aspect ratio
  • astern
  • astrolabe
  • Athene
  • athwartships
  • Atlantis
  • Atlas
  • atoll
  • a-trip.
  • auks
  • aurora
  • auster
  • automatic identification system
  • automatic pilot
  • auxiliary.
  • Avalon
  • avast
  • Avery, John (b. c.1653)
  • awash
  • a-weigh, or aweigh
  • awning.
  • axle-trees.
  • ‘aye aye, sir’
  • azimuth
  • azimuth compass
  • B
  • baboon watch
  • babystay
  • back, to.
  • back a strand, to
  • backboard
  • back splice
  • backstay
  • badge
  • baggywrinkle
  • bagpipe the mizzen, to
  • bag reef
  • bail, to
  • balance, to
  • balancelle
  • Balboa, Vasco Nuñez de (1475–1519)
  • bald headed
  • bale
  • balinger
  • balk
  • Ballard, Robert D. (b. 1942)
  • ballast
  • banjo
  • banker
  • Banks, Sir Joseph (1743–1820)
  • banyan days
  • Barbarossa
  • Barbary pirates
  • barbette
  • barca-longa
  • barcarolle, or barcarole
  • bare boat, or demise, charter
  • Barents, Willem (c.1550–97)
  • bare poles
  • barge
  • bargee
  • bark
  • bark's head
  • barnacle
  • barograph
  • barometer
  • barque, or bark
  • barquentine, or barkenteen
  • ‘barrack stanchion’
  • barratry
  • barricade
  • barricado
  • Bart, Jean (1650–1702)
  • ‘Bartimeus’
  • basilisk
  • Batavia
  • bateloe
  • bathyscaphe
  • bathysphere
  • batten.
  • batten down, to
  • battlecruiser
  • battle honours
  • battleship
  • bawley
  • bay.
  • bayamo
  • beachcomber
  • beacon.
  • beak
  • beakhead
  • beam.
  • beam ends.
  • bean-cod
  • bear, to
  • bearing
  • beat, to.
  • Beaufort Scale
  • becalm, to
  • becket.
  • becue, to
  • bed.
  • bee
  • bee blocks
  • beetle
  • before the mast
  • beitass
  • belay, to
  • belaying pins
  • Belfast, HMS
  • belfry
  • bell buoy
  • Bellerophon, HMS
  • Bellingshausen, Fabian Gottlieb von (1778–1852)
  • bellum
  • belly band
  • bend.
  • bends.
  • beneaped
  • Bentinck.
  • ‘bent on a splice’
  • bergantina
  • Bering or Behring, Vitus (1681–1741)
  • Bermudan rig, or Bermudian rig
  • Bermuda triangle
  • berth.
  • berthing hawsers
  • Berthon boat
  • best bower
  • between decks
  • bezan, or bizan
  • bibbs
  • ‘bible’
  • Big Class
  • bight.
  • bilander, or billander
  • bilboes
  • bilge.
  • bilge keel
  • bill of health
  • bill of lading.
  • bill of sight
  • bill of store
  • billy-boy, or billy-boat
  • Bimini top
  • bingeing
  • binnacle (formerly bittacle)
  • biological oceanography
  • bird's nest.
  • bireme
  • biscuit
  • bite, to
  • bitter
  • bitts
  • bitt stopper
  • ‘Blackbeard’
  • blackbirding
  • black-down, to
  • black jack.
  • black ship
  • black squall
  • ‘black's the white of my eye’
  • black strake
  • Blackwall frigates
  • Blake, Sir Peter (1948–2001)
  • Blake, Robert (1599–1657)
  • blake slip
  • bleed, to.
  • Bligh, William (1754–1817)
  • block
  • blockade
  • block coefficient
  • blockship
  • ‘blood is thicker than water’
  • ‘bloody flag’
  • ‘blowing great guns and small arms’
  • ‘blowing the grampus’
  • blue ensign.
  • bluejacket
  • blue light
  • blue peter
  • ‘blue pigeon’
  • blue riband, or ribband
  • board.
  • boarders
  • Board of Longitude
  • boat
  • boathook.
  • boating
  • Boat People
  • boatswain
  • boatswain's chair
  • boatswain's pipe
  • bobstay
  • body plan
  • boeier, or boier
  • bollard
  • bolster
  • bolt-rope
  • Bombard, Alain (1924–2005)
  • bomb ketch
  • bonaventure
  • bone.
  • bonnet.
  • booby
  • booby-hatch.
  • boom.
  • boom boats
  • boom-irons
  • booms
  • bootneck
  • boottop
  • booty
  • bora
  • bore, or eager
  • ‘born with a silver spoon’
  • boss
  • bo'sun
  • botargo
  • botter
  • ‘bottle’
  • bottlescrew, or turnbuckle
  • bottomry, sometimes also known as bummaree
  • Bougainville, Comte Louis Antoine de (1729–1811)
  • bounty
  • Bounty
  • bow
  • bow-chaser
  • bower anchors
  • bow-grace
  • bowline (pron. bolin as in no).
  • bowse, to
  • bowsprit (pron. bo- as in no), orig. boltsprit
  • bow thruster
  • box-hauling
  • box off, to
  • box the compass, to
  • brace, to
  • ‘brace of shakes’
  • braces
  • brackets
  • brails
  • brake
  • branch
  • Brasil or Brazil, or Hy Brazil
  • brassbounder
  • breach, to.
  • ‘bread-room jack’
  • break
  • break bulk, to
  • breaker.
  • breaking ground
  • break sheer, to.
  • breakwater.
  • breaming
  • breast backstays
  • breeches buoy
  • breeching
  • breech of a block
  • Brendan (c.484–578)
  • bridge
  • bridle.
  • bridle-port
  • brig.
  • brigantine
  • brine, or pickle
  • bring to, to
  • bring up, to
  • Britannia.
  • Britomart
  • ‘Britons, Strike Home’
  • broach to, to
  • broad pennant
  • broadside
  • broke or broken
  • broom.
  • Brunel, Isambard Kingdom (1896–59)
  • bubble horizon
  • buccaneers.
  • Bucentaur
  • ‘bucko’ mate
  • budge-barrel
  • bugeye
  • buggalow, or bugalilo
  • Builders Old Measurement
  • bulbous bow
  • bulge
  • bulk carrier
  • bulkhead
  • ‘bullock’
  • bull rope.
  • bullseye.
  • bully beef
  • bulwark
  • bumboat
  • bumpkin, or bumkin
  • ‘bundleman’
  • bunk
  • bunkers
  • bunt
  • bunting
  • buntline hitch
  • buntlines
  • buoy
  • buoyancy tank, or airtank
  • burgee
  • burgoo
  • burthen
  • Bushnell, David (c.1742–1824)
  • busking
  • buss
  • ‘butcher's bill’
  • butt.
  • Butter-box
  • buttock lines
  • Buys Ballot law
  • by
  • by guess and by God
  • Byng, John (1704–57)
  • by the board
  • by the head
  • by the lee
  • C
  • cabin
  • cabin sole
  • cable.
  • cable-holders
  • cable-laid rope
  • cable ship
  • cable stoppers
  • cable-tier
  • caboose, also camboose
  • Cabot, John, the Anglicized form of Caboto, Giovanni (c.1450–98)
  • cabotage
  • caique
  • caisson
  • calashee, or coolashi, watch,, watch
  • Cales
  • calf.
  • calibre
  • call
  • call sign
  • camber.
  • camel.
  • camship
  • can buoy
  • cannon.
  • canoe
  • cant.
  • cant rope
  • Canute, or Cnut (c.995–1035)
  • canvas.
  • cap
  • Cape Horners.
  • Cape Horn fever
  • caper
  • capital ship
  • capping
  • capsize, to
  • capstan
  • captain
  • captain's servant
  • caravel
  • carbon fibre
  • carcass
  • cardinal mark
  • cardinal points
  • careen, to
  • cargo jack
  • cargo net
  • carley float
  • carlings, or carlines
  • carous
  • carpenter's stopper
  • carrack
  • carrick bend
  • carronade
  • carry, to
  • carrying away
  • cartel.
  • carvel
  • carvel built
  • casco
  • case-shot.
  • cast, to
  • castaway
  • cast off, to
  • cast of the lead
  • cat.
  • catamaran
  • catboat
  • catenary
  • catharpings, or catharpins.
  • Cathay
  • cathead
  • catholes
  • cat-o’-nine-tails
  • catspaw.
  • catwalk
  • caulk, to
  • cavitation
  • ceiling
  • celestial navigation, or astronomical navigation.
  • celestial sphere
  • centreboard
  • centre of buoyancy
  • centre of effort
  • centre of lateral resistance
  • centring chains
  • cesser clause
  • chain
  • chain, or cable, locker
  • chain-plates
  • chains.
  • chain shot
  • Challenger, HMS
  • chambers.
  • ‘channel fever’
  • chantey, or chanty
  • Chapelle, Howard Irving (1900–75)
  • chapelled
  • chapels
  • characteristic
  • charley noble
  • Charlotte Dundas
  • chart
  • chart datum
  • charter
  • chartmaking.
  • chase.
  • chase guns
  • chasse-marée
  • Chatham Chest
  • chearly
  • check, to.
  • cheeks.
  • cheese down, to
  • chemical oceanography
  • Chesapeake, USS
  • chesstrees
  • Chiloé
  • chine
  • Chinese gybe
  • chinse, orig. chinch, to,, to
  • chip log
  • chips.
  • chock, to
  • chock-a-block
  • chocolate gale
  • choking the luff
  • chops
  • Christian, Fletcher (1764–93?)
  • chronometer
  • c.i.f.
  • Cinque Ports
  • Cipangu
  • clamps.
  • clap on, to
  • class
  • classification
  • claw off, to
  • claw ring
  • clean
  • clean bill
  • clean slate
  • clear, to
  • clearance
  • ‘clear lower deck’
  • clear-view screen
  • cleat.
  • clench, to.
  • Clermont
  • clew.
  • clew lines
  • climate change.
  • clinching
  • clinker, or clinch, built
  • clip-hooks
  • clipper
  • close hauled
  • close-quarters.
  • close reefed.
  • clothes
  • clothing
  • cloths
  • cloud formations
  • clove hitch
  • club haul, to
  • clump block
  • coach
  • ‘coach horses’
  • coach-roof
  • coachwhipping
  • coak.
  • coaming
  • coastal navigation.
  • coaster
  • coastguard
  • Coast Pilot
  • coat
  • cobbing
  • coble
  • cockbill, or a-cockbill.
  • cocked hat
  • cockpit.
  • cockscomb
  • cod
  • cod-banger
  • cod-end
  • codline
  • cofferdam.
  • cog.
  • coil
  • coir
  • collar.
  • collier
  • collision mat
  • Colossus
  • colours
  • Colregs
  • colt
  • Columbus, Christopher (1451–1506)
  • ‘combing the cat’
  • come, to
  • come home, to.
  • commander.
  • commission.
  • commissioning pennant
  • commodore
  • common whipping
  • companion
  • companion ladder
  • company
  • compartments.
  • compass
  • compass error
  • compass rose
  • compass timber
  • composite built
  • composite great circle sailing
  • compound engine
  • comprador
  • compressor, or compressor stopper, stopper
  • con, cond, or cun, to,, to
  • concluding line
  • condemn, to
  • condenser
  • Confederate States Navy (CSN)
  • conical buoy
  • conning tower.
  • Conrad, Joseph (1857–1924)
  • Consol
  • Constellation, USS
  • Constitution, USS
  • constructive total loss
  • container ship
  • Continental Navy
  • continental shelf
  • continuous voyage
  • contline
  • contraband
  • convoy
  • Cook, James (1728–79)
  • coordinates
  • copper sheathing
  • coracle
  • coral reefs
  • corbita
  • cord
  • Corinthian
  • Coriolis force
  • corsair
  • corvette
  • Costain gun
  • cot
  • counter
  • counter-brace, to.
  • counter-currents
  • course.
  • Cousteau, Jacques-Yves (1910–97)
  • cove.
  • covering board
  • cow-hitch
  • cowl.
  • coxswain, orig. cockswain
  • crab
  • craft
  • cran
  • crance, crans, or cranze.
  • crane lines.
  • crank.
  • creeper
  • crib
  • crimp
  • cringle
  • crossing the line
  • ‘crossing the T’
  • cross-jack (pron. crojeck or crojick) yard, yard
  • cross lashing
  • cross sea
  • cross-staff, or forestaff
  • crosstrees
  • crowd, to
  • crown.
  • crow's foot
  • crow's nest
  • cruiser, orig. cruizer
  • cruise ship
  • ‘crusher’
  • Crustacea
  • crutch.
  • CSS
  • cubbridge heads
  • cuddy
  • culverin
  • Cunningham
  • currach or curragh
  • currents
  • cut and run, to
  • cutch
  • cutlass
  • cut of his (her) jib, the
  • cut splice
  • cutter
  • cutter rig
  • cutting his painter
  • Cutty Sark
  • cutwater
  • cyclone
  • D
  • dagger
  • dagger-board
  • dahabeeyah, or dahabiah
  • damelopre
  • Dampier, William (1652–1715)
  • Dana, Richard Henry (1815–82)
  • dan buoy
  • dandy-rig
  • Darling, Grace Horsley (1815–42)
  • Darwin, Charles (1809–82)
  • Darwin mounds
  • ‘Davids’
  • Davis's quadrant, or back-staff
  • davits
  • Davy Jones
  • deadeye, orig. dead-man's-eye
  • dead freight
  • dead horse
  • deadlight
  • dead marine
  • dead men
  • dead reckoning
  • dead shares
  • dead water
  • deadweight tonnage
  • deadwood
  • dead work
  • Decca
  • decker
  • deckhouse
  • decks
  • declination
  • decompression sickness
  • deep
  • Deep Scattering Layers (DSLs)
  • degauss, to, or degaussing
  • degree
  • de Horsey rig
  • demurrage
  • departure.
  • depth charge
  • Derbyshire
  • derelict
  • derrick
  • derroterro
  • destroyer
  • deviation
  • devil
  • dghaisa (pron. duyser as in buy)
  • dhow
  • diagonal built
  • diamond knot
  • diamond shrouds
  • diaphone
  • Diaz de Novaes, Bartholomew (c.1455–1500)
  • dickies
  • diesel engine
  • differential global satellite navigation systems
  • digital selective calling (DSC)
  • dinghy
  • dip
  • dipping lug
  • director sight
  • dirk
  • disadvantage
  • Discovery Investigations
  • dismast, to
  • displacement
  • distant signals
  • distress signals
  • ditty box
  • diving.
  • dock
  • dockyard
  • dodger
  • dog, to
  • dogger
  • Dogger Bank
  • doghouse
  • dogs.
  • dog-stopper
  • dog vane
  • dog watches
  • doldrums
  • dolly.
  • dolphin.
  • dolphin striker
  • donkey engine
  • donkey frigate
  • donkey's breakfast
  • Dorade ventilator
  • dory.
  • double bottoms
  • double capstan
  • double-clewed jib
  • double clews, or clues
  • double diagonal build
  • double ender
  • doubling.
  • ‘Down Easter’
  • downhaul
  • Downs
  • drabler, or drabbler
  • drag.
  • drag chains
  • Drake, Sir Francis (c.1543–96)
  • Drake's drum
  • draught.
  • draw, to.
  • Dreadnought
  • dredge
  • dredger
  • dress ship, to
  • drift.
  • drifter
  • drift net
  • drive, to.
  • driver.
  • drogue
  • dromon, or dromond
  • drop keel.
  • drown the miller, to
  • drumhead
  • dry-dock
  • dub, or dubb, to
  • ducking at the yardarm
  • ‘duck up’
  • dugout
  • DUKW
  • Dulcibella
  • dumb barge
  • dunnage
  • dwt
  • ‘dynaship’
  • E
  • eagre
  • earing
  • ease, to, or easy
  • East India Company
  • East Indiamen
  • ebb
  • echinoderms
  • echo sounder
  • ecliptic
  • eddy
  • eels
  • electric propulsion
  • electronic charts
  • El Niño
  • embargo
  • embark, to
  • engines
  • ensign.
  • enter, to.
  • Enterprize
  • entrepôt
  • entry
  • environmental issues.
  • ephemeris
  • EPIRB, or Electronic Position Indicator Radio Beacon
  • equinoctial
  • Erik the Red (fl.985)
  • esnecca, or snekkja
  • establishment of the port
  • Eugenie
  • evaporators
  • even keel.
  • Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ).
  • Execution Dock
  • exploration by sea
  • explosion vessel
  • eye.
  • eyebolts
  • F
  • fag-end
  • faggots
  • fag out, to
  • fair
  • fairlead
  • fairway
  • fall
  • fall off, to
  • false fire
  • false keel
  • fancy line.
  • Fanny Adams
  • fantail
  • fardage
  • farthell, to
  • fashion pieces
  • fast
  • fathom
  • fay, to
  • feather, to.
  • feaze, to
  • felucca
  • fender
  • fend off, to
  • ferry
  • fetch, to
  • fid.
  • fiddle
  • fiddle block
  • fiddlehead bow
  • Fiddler's Green
  • fiddley
  • fife rails.
  • fighting instructions
  • ‘Fighting Téméraire’
  • fights
  • figurehead
  • figure of eight knot
  • filibuster
  • fill, to
  • ‘fire and lights’
  • fireships
  • fireworks
  • First Fleet
  • fish
  • fish, to.
  • fisheries
  • fisherman's bend
  • fishing boat
  • fishing fleet.
  • fitting out
  • Fitzroy, Robert (1805–65)
  • fix
  • fixed and flashing light
  • fixed light
  • flag
  • flag etiquette
  • flag rank
  • flagship
  • flags of convenience
  • flake, or fake
  • flare.
  • flashing light
  • flatboat
  • fleet.
  • fleet train
  • Flemish horse
  • flense, to
  • Flinders, Matthew (1774–1814)
  • floating battery
  • floating dock
  • float plan
  • flogging round the fleet
  • flog the glass, to
  • flood
  • floor
  • flota
  • flotilla
  • flotsam.
  • flowers of the wind
  • flowing.
  • fluke.
  • fluky
  • flush deck
  • fly.
  • fly-boat
  • fly-by-night
  • Flying Dutchman, the
  • flying jib
  • f.o.b.
  • fo‘c'sle
  • fog-buoy
  • foghorn
  • fog signals.
  • foot
  • ‘foot it in’
  • footropes
  • fore-and-aft rig.
  • forebitter
  • forecastle, (pron. fo‘c'sle)
  • forefoot
  • fore-ganger.
  • foregirt, or fargood
  • foreguy
  • Foreland, North and South
  • forelock
  • fore-reach
  • foresail
  • fore-sheets
  • forestay
  • Forester, Cecil Scott (1899–1966)
  • fore-triangle
  • foreturn
  • forge over, to.
  • former
  • Fortunus
  • forward (pron. forrard)
  • fothering
  • foul
  • foul, or fouled, anchor.
  • fouling.
  • founder, to
  • fox
  • Fram
  • frame
  • Franklin, Sir John (1786–1847)
  • frap, to
  • free.
  • freeboard
  • freezing
  • freight
  • Frenchman
  • ‘freshening his hawse’
  • freshes
  • Friendship sloop
  • frigate
  • Frobisher, or Forbisher, Sir Martin (c.1535–94)
  • frocking
  • front.
  • full and by
  • ‘full sea’
  • fulmars
  • Fulton, Robert (1765–1815)
  • furl, to
  • furniture
  • furring
  • futtock
  • futtock shrouds, or puttock shrouds
  • G
  • Gabbard, the
  • Gades
  • gaff
  • gaff rig
  • gage, sometimes gauge
  • gale
  • galizabra
  • galleass, or galleasse
  • galleon
  • gallery
  • galley.
  • galley frigate
  • galley pepper
  • galligaskins
  • galliot
  • gallows.
  • Gama, Vasco da (c.1460–1524)
  • gammon iron
  • gammon lashing, or gammoning
  • gang
  • gangway
  • gantline
  • gantlope, or gauntlope (pron. gantlet)
  • garboard, or garboard strake
  • garland.
  • garnet
  • ‘garters’
  • gasket
  • gas-turbine engines
  • gate vessel
  • gaussin error
  • general-at-sea
  • general average
  • general chase
  • Gennaker
  • genoa
  • gentlemen captains
  • geological oceanography
  • German mile
  • get spliced, to
  • ghoster
  • ghosting
  • gig
  • gimbals
  • gimblet, to, or gimbleting
  • gin block
  • gingerbread, or gingerbread work
  • gin palace
  • gird, to
  • girdle
  • girt.
  • glass
  • Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS)
  • global positioning system
  • globe
  • globular projection
  • Gloire
  • glut.
  • GMDSS
  • gnomonic chart
  • ‘gobbie’
  • going about
  • goke
  • gondola
  • gong buoy
  • Goodwin Sands, the
  • gooseneck
  • goose-winged
  • goose-wings
  • gores
  • GPS, or global positioning system
  • grab
  • grain
  • Grand Banks, the
  • Grand Fleet
  • grapnel, sometimes grapple
  • grass-line
  • graticule.
  • grave, to
  • graving dock
  • Great Barrier Reef
  • Great Britain
  • great circle
  • great circle sailing
  • Great Eastern
  • Great Harry
  • Great Western
  • Greek fire
  • green men
  • Greenwich Mean Time (GMT)
  • gregale
  • Grenville, Sir Richard (1542–91)
  • ‘Greta Garbo’
  • grid, or gridiron
  • gripe, to
  • gripes
  • grog
  • ‘grog-blossom’
  • gromet, or grummett
  • grommet (pron. grummet)
  • ground tackle
  • ground tier
  • group
  • grow, to
  • growler
  • GRP
  • GRT
  • guarda-costa
  • guardrail
  • guard-ship
  • gudgeon, orig. googing.
  • guerre de course
  • guest-rope
  • gufah, or gopher
  • Gulf Stream
  • gull
  • gull, to
  • gun
  • gunboat
  • gundalow, or gundelo
  • gunner's daughter
  • gunport
  • gunroom
  • gun tackle
  • gunter rig
  • gunwale (pron. gunnel).
  • guy.
  • gyassi, or gaiassa
  • gybe, or jibe, to
  • gyn
  • gypsy
  • gyroscopic, or gyro, compass
  • H
  • hack watch
  • Hadley's reflecting quadrant
  • Hakluyt, Richard (pron. Hacklit) (c.1552–1616)
  • half beams
  • half-deck
  • half hitch
  • half-musket shot
  • ‘half seas over’
  • halyards, or halliards
  • hambro line
  • hammock
  • hance
  • hand, to
  • hand-bearing compass
  • hand over hand
  • handsomely
  • handy billy
  • hank.
  • Hanseatic League
  • harbour dues
  • harden in, to
  • harmattan
  • harness cask
  • harpings, or harpens.
  • hatch
  • haul, to
  • Hawkins, Sir John (1532–95)
  • hawse
  • hawse bag
  • hawsehole
  • hawse-pieces
  • hawsepipe
  • hawser
  • hawser-laid rope
  • haze, to
  • head
  • headboard
  • head-rope
  • heads
  • headsail
  • heart
  • ‘Heart of Oak’
  • heave to, to.
  • heaving line
  • heel.
  • heeling error
  • heeling moment
  • Hellespont
  • helm
  • hemp
  • hengst
  • Henry Grâce à Dieu
  • Henry the Navigator (1394–1460)
  • hermaphrodite brig
  • Herreshoff, Nathanael Greene (1848–1938)
  • herring
  • Heyerdahl, Thor (1914–2002)
  • Highfield lever
  • high seas
  • High Seas Fleet
  • Hispaniola
  • hitch
  • HMS
  • hog.
  • hoist.
  • hold
  • holiday
  • holystone
  • hood
  • hood-ends
  • hooker.
  • hoop.
  • hopper
  • Horatio Hornblower
  • horizon
  • horizontal sextant angle
  • hornpipe
  • horns.
  • horse.
  • horse latitudes
  • horsing iron
  • ‘hot chase’
  • hounds
  • hour angle
  • house, to
  • hovercraft
  • hoy
  • huddock
  • Hudson, Henry (b. c.1565, d. after June 1611)
  • hulk.
  • hull.
  • hullock
  • husband, or ship's husband
  • Hy Brazil
  • hydrodynamics
  • hydrofoil
  • hydrography
  • hydroplanes
  • hydrothermal vents
  • hyperbolic navigation system.
  • I
  • IALA maritime buoyage system
  • ice
  • ice-breaker
  • idlers
  • impressment
  • inertial navigation.
  • Inmarsat
  • in soundings, or on soundings.
  • in stays
  • intercept
  • International Code of Signals
  • International Congress of Maritime Museums (ICMM)
  • International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS)
  • International Date Line
  • International Lifeboat Federation (ILF)
  • international maritime law
  • International Maritime Organization (IMO)
  • International Metre Class
  • International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea
  • International Rule
  • International Sailing Federation (ISAF)
  • Irish horse
  • Irish pennants
  • ironclads
  • irons.
  • irradiation
  • isobath
  • isogonic lines
  • isolated danger mark
  • J
  • jack.
  • jackanapes coat
  • jackass.
  • jackass-barque
  • jack in the basket
  • Jack of the Dust
  • jackstaff
  • jackstay
  • Jack tar
  • jackyard
  • jackyard topsail
  • Jacob's ladder.
  • jaegt
  • Jamaica discipline
  • jaw.
  • J-class yachts
  • jeers
  • jellyfish
  • jetboats
  • jetsam
  • jettison, to
  • jetty
  • jewel blocks
  • jew's harp
  • jib
  • jib-boom
  • jibe, to
  • jib-headed topsail
  • jib-of-jibs
  • jigger.
  • jigger-mast
  • jockey pole
  • joggle shackle
  • ‘jollies’
  • jolly-boat
  • Jolly Roger
  • Jonah
  • Jones, John Paul (1747–92)
  • Jubilee Sailing Trust
  • jugle, or joggle
  • ‘jumbo’
  • jumper
  • jumping, or jumper, wire
  • junk.
  • junk rig.
  • jury rig
  • jylson, or jillson, block
  • K
  • kamal
  • kamikaze
  • kapal
  • kayak
  • K-class submarine
  • Kearsage, USS
  • keckle, to
  • kedge
  • keel.
  • keel blocks
  • keel-hauling
  • keelson, or kelson
  • kelpie
  • Kentish Knock
  • kentledge
  • ketch
  • kevel, sometimes known as kennet
  • Kevlar
  • key, or cay
  • khamsin, or kamsin
  • Khizr
  • kicking strap
  • Kidd, or Kid, Captain William (c.1645–1701)
  • Kiel Canal
  • kellick, or killock
  • kingpost
  • king spoke
  • King's Letter boy
  • kite.
  • klipper
  • knarr
  • knee
  • knightheads
  • knock down, to
  • knot.
  • kraken
  • krill
  • ‘kye’
  • L
  • L.
  • labour, to
  • lace.
  • ladder.
  • lade, to
  • lagan
  • lagoon
  • laid
  • laminated construction
  • Lanby buoy
  • land breeze
  • landmark
  • landsmen, or landmen
  • langrel, or langrace, or, in American usage, langrage
  • lanyard
  • lapstrake
  • larboard
  • ‘larbolins’, or ‘larbolians’
  • large
  • lash, to
  • lask, to
  • laskets
  • lateen rig
  • lateral mark
  • latitude
  • launch.
  • launching
  • lay.
  • lay days
  • lay up, to.
  • lazaretto, lazaret, lazarette.
  • lazy guy
  • lazyjacks
  • lazy painter
  • leading block
  • leading mark
  • leading wind
  • lead line
  • league
  • leatherneck
  • lee
  • leeboards.
  • leech
  • lee-fang
  • ‘lee-oh’
  • leeskaertan
  • leeward (pron. loo’ard)
  • leeway
  • leg
  • legs
  • lem, to, or lemming
  • lemsteraak
  • Lesseps, Ferdinand de (1805–94)
  • let fly, to.
  • ‘let go and haul’, or ‘afore haul’
  • letter of marque
  • levanter
  • leviathan
  • Lewis, David (1917–2003)
  • liberty
  • Liberty ships
  • lie to, to, or lying a-try
  • lieutenant
  • lifeboat
  • lifelines
  • lifesaving.
  • lifts
  • lighter
  • lighthouse
  • light lists
  • lightship
  • ‘light to’
  • lignum vitae
  • limbers
  • ‘Limey’
  • line of battle
  • line of bearing
  • line officers
  • liner
  • lines
  • linings
  • list
  • lizard
  • Ljungstrom rig
  • Lloyd's
  • Lloyd's Register
  • load line
  • loblolly boy
  • lobscouse
  • lodeman
  • lodestar
  • lodestone, or loadstone
  • log.
  • log book
  • loggerhead.
  • log-line
  • loll
  • longboat
  • long clothes
  • longitude
  • long-jawed
  • long-lining
  • longship
  • long splice
  • loof.
  • loom.
  • loose, to
  • loose cannon
  • loose-footed
  • Loran-C.
  • lorcha
  • Lord High Admiral
  • Lord Mayor's Men
  • low and aloft
  • lower deck
  • lubber's hole
  • lubber's line, or point
  • luff
  • luff tackle
  • lug.
  • lugger
  • lugsail
  • lunar distance
  • lunar parallax
  • lunch hook
  • Lusitania
  • lutchet
  • Lutine bell
  • Lyonesse
  • M
  • macaroni lug
  • macaroni mate
  • Madoc
  • Mae West
  • Maelduin, The Voyage of
  • maelstrom
  • Magellan, Ferdinand (c.1480–1521)
  • magellanic clouds
  • magnetic compass
  • magnitude
  • Mahan, Alfred Thayer (1840–1914)
  • mainsail
  • ‘mainsail haul’
  • make and mend
  • make her number, to
  • Mallows
  • manger
  • mangroves
  • manifest
  • manila
  • manta ray (Manta birostris)
  • man the yards, to, or man ship, to
  • marconi rig
  • Marco Polo (c.1254–1324)
  • Marcq Saint-Hilaire method
  • Marder, Arthur Jacob (1910–80)
  • mare clausum, or ‘Closed Sea’
  • marina
  • marine and underwater archaeology.
  • marine biology
  • marine literature.
  • marine mammals
  • marine meteorology
  • marine painting.
  • marine pharmaceuticals
  • marine plants
  • marine reptiles
  • marines
  • Marine Society
  • Marin-Marie
  • Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA)
  • maritime museums and museum ships
  • mark
  • marl, or marle, to
  • marlin
  • marline
  • marline spike
  • marling hitch
  • maroon, to
  • MARPOL
  • marry, to
  • Marryat, Frederick (1792–1848)
  • martingale.
  • martnets
  • Mary Celeste
  • Mary Rose
  • Masefield, John Edward (1878–1967)
  • mast
  • mast coat
  • master
  • master-at-arms
  • master's mate
  • mast ship
  • mate.
  • Matthew Walker knot
  • Maury, Matthew Fontaine (1806–73)
  • ‘mayday’
  • Mayflower
  • Melville, Herman (1819–91)
  • men-in-lieu
  • Mercator projection
  • merchant marine
  • mercy ships
  • meridian
  • mermaids
  • Merrimac, USS
  • merrow
  • merry dancers
  • Merry Men of May
  • messenger.
  • metacentric height
  • meteorology
  • middle ground
  • middle passage
  • midshipman
  • millibar
  • mirage
  • mistral
  • mitre
  • mizzen
  • Moby-Dick
  • moidore
  • mole
  • molluscs
  • mollymawk
  • monitor
  • monkey.
  • monkey block
  • monkey jacket
  • monkey's fist
  • monk's seam
  • monsoon
  • moon-lore.
  • moonrakers
  • moor, to
  • mooring
  • Morgan, Sir Henry (c.1635–88)
  • Morse code
  • moses
  • Mother Carey's Chickens
  • motor yachts
  • moulding
  • mould-loft
  • moulds
  • mouse
  • mudhook
  • Mulberry Harbours.
  • multihull
  • murderer
  • muster, to
  • mutiny
  • MV
  • MY
  • Mylar
  • N
  • ‘naked’
  • ‘Nancy Dawson’
  • Nansen, Fridtjof (1861–1930)
  • nao
  • Narrow Seas
  • National Coastwatch Institution (NCI)
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
  • nautical almanac
  • nautical mile
  • Nautilus
  • nautophone
  • naval architecture
  • naval hoods or whoods
  • navel pipe
  • navicert
  • navigate, to
  • navigation
  • Navigation Acts
  • navigational warnings
  • navigation lights
  • navigator
  • NAVTEX.
  • navy
  • neal-to
  • neap tides
  • nef
  • Nelson, Horatio, first Viscount (1758–1805)
  • Neptune
  • Nereides
  • Nereus
  • net register tonnage
  • nettings.
  • nettle, sometimes written as knittle.
  • New Ironsides, USS
  • nigger heads
  • nip.
  • nipper.
  • Noah's Ark
  • nocturnal
  • Nore, the
  • Norman.
  • ‘no room to swing a cat’
  • North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)
  • north magnetic pole
  • North-West Passage
  • notices to mariners
  • nugger, or nuggar
  • ‘number’
  • nun buoy
  • nut
  • O
  • oakum
  • oar
  • O’Brian, Patrick (1914–2000)
  • occulting light
  • Oceania
  • Oceanides, or Oceanitides
  • ocean liners
  • oceanographic institutes.
  • oceanography
  • ocean racing
  • oceans.
  • Oceanus
  • octant
  • Odysseus
  • offing
  • offshore oil and gas.
  • off soundings
  • off the wind
  • oldster
  • Oleron, the Laws of
  • Omega
  • one-design class
  • ‘on the beach’
  • on the wind
  • open hawse
  • order of sailing
  • ordinary
  • ordinary seaman
  • orlop, orig. over-lop
  • Oropesa sweep
  • otter
  • outhaul
  • outlicker, outligger, or outleager
  • outrigger.
  • overfall
  • overhaul, to.
  • over-raked
  • overtaking light
  • ox-eye
  • oxter plate
  • P
  • Pacific iron.
  • packet
  • paddle steamer
  • paddle-wheel boat
  • painter
  • pair of oars
  • palm.
  • pampero
  • Panama Canal
  • Panama plate
  • papagayo
  • parallax.
  • paraselene
  • paravane
  • parbuckle
  • parcel, to
  • pareja
  • parhelion
  • ‘parish-rigged’
  • Park Avenue boom
  • Parliament, or parliamentary, heel
  • parrel, or parral
  • partners
  • part of the ship
  • passarado
  • passaree
  • passat
  • passenger ship
  • passerelle
  • paternoster
  • paunch, or panch
  • pavesse
  • pawls
  • pay, to
  • pay off, to.
  • pay out, to
  • peak.
  • Peary, Robert Edwin (1856–1920)
  • peggy-mast
  • pelorus
  • Pelorus Jack
  • pendant.
  • penguin.
  • pennant, sometimes written as pendant
  • pennon
  • Pepys, Samuel (1633–1703)
  • periagua
  • periplus, or periplous
  • Perry, Matthew Calbraith (1794–1858)
  • Peter the Great (1672–1725)
  • petty officer
  • petty warrant
  • PFD
  • phosphorescence
  • physical oceanography
  • picaroon, or pickaroon
  • pickle.
  • pieces of eight
  • pier
  • pierhead jump
  • pig yoke
  • pillage
  • pillar buoy
  • pillow
  • pilot.
  • pilotage
  • pinch, to
  • pink
  • pinky
  • pinnace.
  • pinrail
  • pintle
  • pipe, to
  • pipe cot
  • pipe down
  • piping the side
  • piracy
  • pirogue, or piragua
  • pitch
  • pitchpole, to
  • plain sailing
  • plane, to
  • plank sheer
  • plankton
  • plat, to.
  • plate.
  • pledget
  • Plimsoll Line
  • plotting sheet
  • plug.
  • plush
  • PLUTO
  • pocket battleship
  • pod
  • point.
  • points of sailing
  • polacre
  • Polaris
  • poleaxe
  • Pole Star
  • pollution
  • Polo, Marco
  • ‘Pompey’
  • pontoon.
  • poop.
  • poop royal
  • poor John
  • port.
  • porthole
  • port-last, or portoise
  • portolano
  • ports
  • port sills, or cills
  • port tack
  • Portuguese man-of-war
  • portulan, or portolan, chart.
  • Poseidon.
  • POSH
  • position line
  • post-bark
  • post-captain
  • Potemkin
  • pouches
  • powder monkey
  • powerboats
  • pram, praam, or prame.
  • pratique
  • press gang
  • preventer
  • prick, to.
  • prime, to
  • prime meridian
  • priming iron
  • prismatic coefficient
  • privateer
  • prize
  • prize money
  • proa
  • propeller
  • propulsion pod
  • protection
  • protest.
  • proviso.
  • prow
  • puddening
  • puffer
  • pull, to
  • pulpit.
  • pump
  • punt.
  • purchase
  • purser.
  • purse seine net
  • pushpit
  • Q
  • Q-ship
  • quadrant
  • quadrilateral jib
  • quadruple expansion engine
  • quarantine
  • quarter
  • quarter bands
  • quarter-bill
  • quarter blocks.
  • quarter-cloths
  • quarterdeck
  • quarter gallery
  • quarter-gunner
  • quartermaster
  • quatuor maria
  • quay
  • quick flashing light
  • quickwork
  • quilting
  • quintant
  • quoin
  • R
  • rabbet
  • rabelo
  • race.
  • racing rules.
  • rack, to
  • racon
  • radar
  • radar reflector
  • raddle
  • radio beacon
  • radio direction finder
  • raffee
  • raft.
  • rake.
  • Raleigh, or Ralegh, Sir Walter c.1552–1618)
  • ram.
  • ramark
  • ram schooner
  • randan
  • random range
  • range, to
  • Ransome, Arthur (1884–1967)
  • rate.
  • rate of change
  • rating.
  • ratline
  • rattle down, to
  • razee, or rasee
  • reach.
  • ‘ready about’
  • reciprocating engine
  • reckoning
  • red ensign.
  • red tides
  • reef.
  • reef-band
  • reef-cringles
  • reef knot
  • reef-points
  • reef-tackle
  • reeming iron
  • reeve, to
  • reformado, or reformade
  • refraction
  • regime
  • register ship
  • register tonnage
  • regulating captain
  • relative bearings
  • relieving tackles.
  • remote sensing
  • render, to.
  • rendezvous
  • replica ship
  • reprisal
  • research ships
  • respondentia
  • Revenge, HMS
  • revenue cutter
  • rhumb line
  • RIB
  • ribband
  • ribs
  • rickers
  • Riddle of the Sands, The
  • ride, to
  • riders.
  • ridge rope
  • riding light
  • riding slip
  • rig.
  • rigger
  • rigging
  • rigging screw
  • rigol
  • ringtail
  • rising
  • RMS
  • RNLI
  • RNR
  • RNVR
  • roach
  • Roaring Forties
  • robands (pron. robbins)
  • Roberts, Bartholomew (1682–1722)
  • robinet
  • Robinson Crusoe
  • rocket
  • roding
  • rogue knot
  • ‘Rogue's March’
  • rogue's yarn
  • roller furler
  • rolling hitch
  • rope
  • rope clutch
  • ro-ro (roll-on roll-off) ship
  • rose box
  • rose lashing
  • rotating rig
  • round, to.
  • round house
  • round of a rope
  • round seizing
  • round ship
  • round turn and two half hitches
  • rouse in, to
  • rouse out, to
  • rov
  • rove
  • rover
  • rowlock
  • royal
  • royal dockyards
  • Royal George, loss of the
  • Royal Yachting Association
  • rubber
  • rubbing strake
  • rudder
  • Rule of the Road
  • run
  • runners
  • running free
  • running rigging
  • run the easting down, to
  • rutter
  • S
  • saddle
  • safe water mark
  • sag, to.
  • saic
  • sail burton
  • sailing
  • sailing directions
  • sailing thwart
  • sailmaker's stitching
  • sailmaker's whipping
  • sailor-by-the-wind
  • sailors’ dress.
  • sails
  • sail training
  • St Elmo's Fire
  • salinity
  • Sallee pirates
  • sally port.
  • salt horse
  • salutes at sea
  • salvage.
  • sampan
  • samson post.
  • sandbagger
  • sand-glass
  • SAR
  • Sargasso Sea
  • sargasso weed
  • satellite navigation
  • Savannah
  • save-all
  • scampavia
  • scandalize, to
  • scant
  • scantlings
  • Scapa Flow
  • ‘Scarborough warning’
  • scarf, or scarph
  • scend (pron. send)
  • schnorkel, or snorkel.
  • schokker
  • schooner
  • scope.
  • score.
  • scotsman
  • Scott, Robert Falcon (1868–1912)
  • scow
  • screw slip
  • scrimshaw
  • SCUBA
  • scud, to
  • scull, to
  • sculler
  • scupper, to
  • scuppers
  • scurvy
  • scuttle.
  • scuttle, or scuttled, butt
  • Scylla and Charybdis
  • sea anchor
  • Sea Beggars
  • seabirds.
  • seaboat
  • Seacat
  • seacock
  • Sea Fencibles
  • sea gods and goddesses
  • seahorses
  • sea level.
  • sealing
  • Sea Lord
  • seam.
  • seamanship
  • seaman's quadrant
  • sea-mark
  • sea-pie
  • seas.
  • sea songs
  • seaweeds
  • sections
  • seel, to
  • seize, to
  • seizing
  • Selkirk, Alexander (1676–1721)
  • selvagee
  • semaphore
  • semi-diameter
  • sepulchral ships
  • serang
  • serpentine
  • serve, orig. sarve, to
  • serving mallet
  • set.
  • settee
  • settle, to
  • sewed, (pron. sued)
  • sextant
  • shackle.
  • Shackleton, Sir Ernest Henry (1874–1922)
  • shake.
  • ‘shake a cloth in the wind, to’
  • ‘shake a leg’
  • shake out a reef, to
  • shakings
  • shallop.
  • shamal
  • Shamrock
  • shan
  • shanghai, to.
  • shank
  • shanty, or chantey
  • shape, to
  • sharks
  • Sharp, or Sharpe, Bartholomew (c.1650–88)
  • sharpie.
  • sharpshooter.
  • sharp up
  • shear.
  • sheave
  • sheepshank
  • sheer.
  • sheer draught
  • sheer legs, or sheers
  • sheer pole
  • sheer strake
  • sheet.
  • sheet anchor
  • sheet bend
  • shell.
  • shellback
  • shellfish
  • Shelvocke, George (1675–1742)
  • shift
  • shifter
  • shifting boards
  • ship
  • ship broker
  • shipbuilding.
  • ship-money fleets
  • ship of the line
  • ship preservation
  • ship rigged
  • ship's bell.
  • shipshape and Bristol fashion
  • ship's number
  • shipwrecks
  • shiver.
  • ‘shiver my timbers’
  • shoal.
  • shoe.
  • shoot, to
  • shore
  • short
  • shorten in, to
  • short splice
  • shot
  • Shovel, or Shovell Sir Clowdisley (1659–1707)
  • ‘show a leg’, or ‘shake a leg’
  • shroud-laid rope
  • shrouds
  • sickbay
  • side lever engine
  • siding
  • sight
  • signal letters
  • signals at sea
  • sill, sometimes written as cill.
  • simoon
  • Simpson's Rules
  • ‘Sinbad the Sailor’
  • ‘singeing the King of Spain's beard’
  • sinnet, synet, sennet, sennit, or sinnit
  • SINS
  • Sirens, or Sirenes
  • Sirius
  • sirocco, or scirocco
  • sisal
  • sister blocks
  • six water grog
  • skeet, or skeat
  • skeg
  • skid-booms, skids, or skid beams
  • skiff
  • skilly
  • skillygalee, or skillygolee
  • skimming dish
  • skipjack
  • skipper
  • ‘skipper's daughters’
  • skylight
  • skysail
  • slab-lines
  • slack water
  • slatch
  • slave trade.
  • slicks
  • slings
  • slip hook
  • slippery hitch
  • slipway
  • Slocum, Joshua (1844–c.1910)
  • sloop.
  • slush
  • smack
  • Smith, Sir Francis Pettit (1808–74)
  • smiting line
  • SMS
  • smuggle, to
  • snatch block
  • snotter
  • snotty
  • snow
  • snub, to.
  • Society for Nautical Research
  • SOLAS
  • ‘soldier's wind’
  • sole
  • sonar
  • songs
  • son of a gun
  • ‘SOS’
  • sound, to.
  • sounding.
  • sounding machine
  • sounding rod
  • Southern Cross
  • South Sea Bubble
  • South Seas
  • spall, to
  • span.
  • Spanish Armada
  • Spanish burton
  • Spanish Main
  • Spanish reef
  • Spanish windlass
  • spanker
  • spar
  • spar buoy
  • spar deck
  • spar torpedo
  • speak, to, or speak to a ship, to
  • special mark
  • spectacle iron, or plate
  • spencer
  • spend, to.
  • Sperry, Elmer Ambrose (1860–1930)
  • spider.
  • spider band
  • spile, to
  • spill, to
  • spilling lines
  • spinnaker.
  • spirketting
  • spitfire jib
  • Spithead
  • splice, to
  • spliced, to get
  • splice the main brace, to
  • spoil ground
  • spoke
  • sponges
  • sponson
  • spoon, to
  • spreaders.
  • spring.
  • spring a leak, to
  • spring stays
  • spring tides
  • sprit
  • spritsail.
  • spunyarn
  • spurling line
  • squadron
  • squadronal colours
  • squall
  • square
  • square rig
  • squid
  • SS
  • stability
  • stabilizers
  • staghorn
  • stanchions
  • standing lug
  • standing part
  • standing rigging
  • starboard
  • starboard tack
  • ‘starbolins’
  • starshell
  • start, to.
  • stateroom
  • station pointer
  • stationaire
  • stave, to
  • staves
  • stay.
  • stayband
  • staysail
  • steaming lights
  • steam propulsion.
  • steam-turbine engine
  • steer, to
  • steerage.
  • steerage way
  • steering gear.
  • steering oar
  • steeve
  • stem.
  • step
  • stern
  • sternboard
  • sternpost
  • stern rope
  • sternsheets
  • sternwalk
  • sternway
  • stevedore
  • stiff.
  • stinkpot
  • stirrups
  • stock
  • stocks
  • stone frigate
  • stop, to
  • stopper
  • stopper knot
  • storm
  • storm signals
  • stowaway
  • strake
  • strand.
  • stray line
  • stream, to
  • stream anchor
  • stretcher.
  • strike, to
  • strike down, to
  • stringer
  • stripped to the girt-line
  • strop
  • studding sails (pron. stuns’ls)
  • submarine
  • sucking the monkey
  • Suez Canal.
  • Sumner position line
  • ‘sundowner’
  • ‘sun is over the yardarm, the’
  • supercargo
  • superstitions of sailors.
  • superstructure
  • surface effect ship
  • surf boat
  • surge, to.
  • swallow
  • ‘swallow the anchor, to’
  • SWATH ship (Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull)
  • sway
  • sweat, to
  • sweep
  • swell
  • swifter.
  • swim, to
  • swing a ship, to
  • swing keel
  • synoptic chart
  • T
  • tabernacle
  • table, to
  • tabling
  • tack.
  • tackle (pron. taykle)
  • tackline.
  • tactical diameter
  • taffrail.
  • tail, to
  • Talbot, Mary Anne (1778–1808)
  • tall ships
  • Talurit® splicing
  • tan, to
  • tanker
  • tar
  • tarpaulin, orig. tarpawling
  • tarpaulin captain
  • tarpaulin muster
  • tarry-breeks
  • tartan, or tartane
  • Tasman, Abel Janszoon (c.1603–59)
  • tattoo.
  • taunt
  • taut
  • taut wire measurement
  • Teach, or Thatch, Edward (d. 1718)
  • tea clippers
  • telltale.
  • tender
  • teredo
  • Terra Australis Incognita
  • territorial waters
  • Tethys
  • Thames Measurement
  • thermocline
  • Thermopylae
  • Thetis
  • thimble
  • thole pin
  • Thomas W. Lawson
  • Thomson, William, first Baron Kelvin (1824–1907)
  • thorough foot, to.
  • ‘three sheets in the wind’
  • ‘three sisters’
  • throat
  • throat halyards
  • throat seizings
  • thrum, to
  • thumb cleat
  • thumb knot
  • Thurot, François (1726–60)
  • thwart
  • ticket
  • tidal atlas
  • tidal power.
  • ‘tiddley’
  • tide-race
  • tide-rip
  • tide-rode
  • tides
  • tideway
  • tiding over
  • tier.
  • tierce
  • tiller
  • tiller ropes
  • tilt
  • timber heads
  • timber hitch
  • timbers
  • timenoguy
  • timoneer
  • Titanic
  • tjalk
  • tjotter
  • toggle.
  • ‘Tom Bowling’ or ‘Tom Bowline’
  • tonnage
  • top
  • top-armours
  • top-chain
  • topgallant mast
  • topgallant sail
  • topgallant yard
  • topmark
  • topmast
  • topmen, or yardmen
  • topping lift
  • topsail.
  • topsail yard
  • topsides.
  • torsion
  • total loss
  • touching
  • tow.
  • towage
  • trabacolo, or trabaccolo
  • track.
  • trade winds
  • traffic separation schemes
  • trail-board
  • train
  • training ships
  • train-tackle
  • tramontana
  • tramp ship
  • trane, or train, oil
  • transom.
  • transport
  • traveller.
  • traverse board
  • traverse table
  • trawler
  • trawls
  • treasure ship.
  • treenails (pron. trennels or trunnels)
  • trench
  • trestle-trees
  • triatic
  • trice up, to
  • trick
  • trident
  • trim.
  • trimaran
  • Trinity House
  • trip an anchor, to
  • triple expansion engine
  • tripping line
  • trireme
  • Triton
  • tropical storms
  • trot
  • truck.
  • true
  • trundle-head
  • truss
  • trysail
  • trysail mast
  • try works
  • tsunami
  • tuck
  • tug
  • tumble-home, or tumbling-home
  • tun
  • tuna
  • turk's head
  • turnbuckle
  • turret
  • turtle-boat
  • turtle deck
  • twice laid.
  • ‘two blocks’
  • tye
  • typhoon
  • U
  • U-boat
  • ullage.
  • umiak
  • Una rig
  • under bare poles
  • under-run, to
  • underwater vehicles
  • under way
  • underwriter
  • United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS).
  • Universal Rule
  • unstayed rig
  • up and down
  • ‘up funnel, down screw’
  • uphroe, or euphroe.
  • upper deck
  • upwelling
  • urca or uxer.
  • US Coast Guard (USCG)
  • US Power Squadrons (USPS)
  • USS
  • US Sailing Association (US Sailing)
  • V
  • vail, to
  • vakka
  • vale, to
  • van
  • Vancouver, George (1757–98)
  • vane.
  • vane self-steering gear
  • vangs
  • variation
  • Vasa
  • veer, to.
  • veer and haul, to
  • Verne, Jules (1828–1905)
  • Verrazzano, Giovanni da (1485–1528)
  • vertex
  • vertical sextant angle
  • very lights
  • Vespucci, Amerigo (1454–1512)
  • Victory, HMS
  • Victory ships
  • victualler
  • Victualling Board
  • vigia
  • Viking compass
  • Villeneuve Pierre Charles Jean Baptiste Silvestre, Comte de (1763–1806)
  • Villiers, Alan John (1903–82)
  • Vinland
  • viol, violl, voyal, or voyol
  • Voss, John Claus (c.1854–1922)
  • Vulcan
  • W
  • waft, to
  • waist
  • waistcloth, or wastecloath
  • waister
  • wale
  • walking beam engine
  • wall knot
  • walt
  • wardrobe
  • wardroom
  • warfare at sea.
  • warm the bell, to
  • warp.
  • Warrior, HMS
  • washstrake, or washboard
  • watch.
  • watch-bill
  • watch buoy
  • water-laid rope
  • water sail
  • waterspout.
  • waterway
  • wave line theory
  • waves
  • ‘wavy navy’
  • way
  • waypoint
  • ways
  • wear, to.
  • weather
  • weather helm.
  • weather lore
  • weatherly.
  • weather ship
  • wedding garland
  • weigh, to
  • well
  • well deck
  • well found
  • West Country whipping
  • ‘wet’
  • wetted surface
  • whack
  • whale
  • whaleboat
  • whaler.
  • whaling
  • wharf.
  • wharfage
  • wharfinger
  • wheelhouse
  • whelps
  • wherry.
  • whip.
  • whipstaff
  • whisker pole
  • whiskers
  • white ensign
  • widows’ men
  • Wilkes, Charles (1798–1877)
  • Wilkins, Sir George Hubert (1888–1958)
  • williwaw
  • winch
  • wind
  • windjammer
  • windlass
  • wind-rode
  • wind-rose
  • windrow
  • windsail
  • windseeker
  • windward
  • wing-in-surface effect ship (WISES)
  • wire rope
  • wishbone
  • woolding, wolding, or woulding
  • worm, to
  • wreck
  • wreck buoy
  • wreckers.
  • wreck vessel
  • X
  • xebec, or sometimes chebeck
  • Y
  • yacht
  • yachtbuilding.
  • yacht clubs
  • yacht designers
  • yachting
  • yacht routine
  • yankee
  • yard.
  • yardarm
  • yardmen
  • yaw, to.
  • yawl
  • ‘yellow admiral’
  • yellow jack
  • yoke
  • yuloh
  • Z
  • zenith
  • zenith distance
  • zone times
  • zulu