Handbook of Blockchain, Digital Finance, and Inclusion: Cryptocurrency, FinTech, InsurTech, and Regulation

Editor/Author LEE Kuo Chuen, David and Deng, Robert H.
Publication Year: 2017
Publisher: Elsevier Science & Technology

Single-User Purchase Price: $180.00
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: $270.00
ISBN: 978-0-12-810442-2
Category: Business, Finance & Economics - Business
Image Count: 268
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

Handbook of Blockchain, Digital Finance, and Inclusion: Cryptocurrency, FinTech, InsurTech, and Regulation explores recent advances in digital banking and cryptocurrency, emphasizing mobile technology and evolving uses of cryptocurrencies as financial assets.

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Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Preface
  • Reshaping the Financial Order
  • 1.1 Megatrends and New Alternatives
  • 1.2 Digital Implications
  • 1.3 Historical Context
  • 1.4 E-commerce and P2P
  • 1.5 The Rise of M-commerce
  • 1.6 Weapons of Mass Consumption
  • 1.7 Banking 2.0
  • 1.8 Understanding the Model
  • 1.9 The Democratization of Banking and Finance
  • 1.10 The Incumbents
  • 1.11 Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain
  • 1.12 The FinTech Promise
  • References
  • From Ant Financial to Alibaba's Rural Taobao Strategy – How Fintech Is Transforming Social Inclusion
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Issues in Rural China
  • 2.3 Alibaba's Rural Taobao Strategy
  • 2.4 Digital Financial Services and Fintech Platforms
  • 2.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • The M-Pesa Technological Revolution for Financial Services in Kenya: A Platform for Financial Inclusion
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Background
  • 3.3 M-Pesa as a Platform for Financial Inclusion
  • 3.4 Impact of M-Pesa Revolution on Financial Inclusion
  • 3.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Financial Inclusion in the Digital Age
  • 4.1 Financial Inclusion
  • 4.2 The Financially Underserved Consumer
  • 4.3 Consequences of Being Financially Underserved
  • 4.4 Financial Exclusion Affects the Middle Class Too, not Just the Poor
  • 4.5 Financially Underserved in Developed Countries
  • 4.6 Financial Health and Financial Security
  • 4.7 Financial Inclusion and Financial Literacy
  • 4.8 Financial Inclusion for Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs)
  • 4.9 Financial Inclusion Matters and Can Be Profitable
  • 4.10 Fintech Revolution Enabled by Smartphones
  • 4.11 Financial Inclusion in China – World's Largest Fintech Market
  • 4.12 Financial Inclusion in India – A Success Story
  • 4.13 Fintech Revolution Examples From Other Countries
  • 4.14 Potential Risks With the New Business Models
  • 4.15 The Path Ahead: Creative Collaboration Between Policymakers, Banks, Telcos and Technology Firms
  • References
  • Using Broadband to Enhance Financial Inclusion
  • 5.1 Introduction: The Potential of Broadband Solutions to Enhance Financial Inclusion
  • 5.2 Deepening Customer Engagement Based on Mass Customization
  • 5.3 Digital Marketplaces Supporting New (Dis-)Intermediation Models
  • 5.4 Specialized Online Service Delivery Models
  • 5.5 Delivery of Financial Information and Education
  • 5.6 Prospects: Globally and in Latin America
  • Mobile Technology and Financial Inclusion
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 The Current Landscape
  • 6.3 Mobile Inclusion Leads to Financial Inclusion
  • 6.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • The Cross-Section of Crypto-Currencies as Financial Assets
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 The Dynamic Environment of a Multiplicity of Crypto-Currencies
  • 7.3 Properties of Crypto-Currency Dynamics
  • 7.4 Conclusion
  • Appendix A Technical Appendix
  • References
  • Econometric Analysis of a Cryptocurrency Index for Portfolio Investment
  • 8.1 Econometric Review of CRIX
  • 8.2 ARIMA Models
  • 8.3 Model with Stochastic Volatility
  • 8.4 Multivariate GARCH Model
  • 8.5 Nutshell and Outlook
  • References
  • Financial Intermediation in Cryptocurrency Markets – Regulation, Gaps and Bridges
  • Abbreviations
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Financial Intermediation in Cryptocurrency Markets
  • 9.3 Exchanges
  • 9.4 Electronic Wallet Providers
  • 9.5 Other Intermediaries
  • 9.6 Future Directions – Filling Gaps and Building Bridges
  • 9.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Legal Risks of Owning Cryptocurrencies
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Money Before Bitcoins
  • 10.3 ‘Digital Money’ Before Bitcoins
  • 10.4 Bitcoins: A Primer
  • 10.5 Cryptocurrency Risks
  • 10.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • InsurTech and FinTech: Banking and Insurance Enablement
  • Acknowledgments
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 InsurTech Activities
  • 11.3 The 4 Most Disruptive Technology
  • 11.4 The 3 Fundamental Trends
  • 11.5 Benefits of InsurTech
  • 11.6 InsurTech Deal Activities
  • 11.7 From FinTech to InsurTech: Mobile Revolution
  • 11.8 Mobile First
  • 11.9 Cross-Sell and Up-Sell
  • 11.10 Virtual Financial Advisor
  • 11.11 Data Driven
  • 11.12 Earned Premiums
  • 11.13 Investment Income
  • 11.14 Underwriting Cost
  • 11.15 Claims Expenses
  • 11.16 Mutual Aid Industry in China
  • 11.17 Zhongtuobang and Shuidihuzhu
  • 11.18 Blockchain Use Cases
  • 11.19 Are Mutual Aid LASIC?
  • 11.20 Conclusion
  • 11.21 Technology Disruptions
  • 11.22 InsurTech Ecosystem
  • References
  • Understanding Interbank Real-Time Retail Payment Systems
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 The Overview of Interbank Payment Landscape
  • 12.3 The Case for Real-Time Retail Payment Systems
  • 12.4 The Characteristics of Real-Time Retail Payment Systems
  • 12.5 Architecture and Design of Real-Time Retail Payment Systems
  • 12.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Real-Time Inbound Marketing: A Use Case for Digital Banking
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Evolution of IT Systems and Marketing Methods in Retail Banking
  • 13.3 Marketing Strategies in Today's Digital Banking Era
  • 13.4 Technology Enablers for Real-Time Inbound Marketing NBO
  • 13.5 Summary
  • Appendix – CEP Patterns and Use Cases for Real-Time Inbound Marketing
  • References
  • Regulation and Supervision in a Digital and Inclusive World
  • 14.1 Fintech Meets Financial Inclusion
  • 14.2 Policy Is Struggling to Keep up With the Market
  • 14.3 A New World for Policymakers, Regulators and Supervisors
  • 14.4 A Risk-Based Approach to Know-Your-Customer
  • 14.5 Emerging Responses to Supervising Digital and Inclusive Markets
  • Singapore Approach to Develop and Regulate FinTech
  • 15.1 MAS Organizational Support for FinTech
  • 15.2 MAS Existing Regulatory Regime
  • 15.3 Shaping Regulatory Approach for Fintech
  • 15.4 “Regulatory Sandbox”
  • 15.5 Closing
  • RegTech: Building a Better Financial System
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 RegTech: A Framework of Analysis
  • 16.3 RegTech in the Financial Services Industry
  • 16.4 Data Driven Regulation
  • 16.5 Looking Forward
  • Ambient Accountability: Shared Ledger Technology and Radical Transparency for Next Generation Digital Financial Services
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Why Now?
  • 17.3 Shared Ledger Building Blocks
  • 17.4 Shared Ledger as Infrastructure: Bank of England Example
  • 17.5 Types of Shared Ledgers
  • 17.6 Shared Ledger Governance
  • 17.7 The New Infrastructure
  • Authors
  • References
  • Peer-To-Peer Lending
  • 18.1 Banking in the Digital Age
  • 18.2 Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Lending: Democratization of Finance
  • 18.3 Rapid Growth After the Global Financial Crisis
  • 18.4 Supporting Financial Inclusion and Economic Growth
  • 18.5 Peer-to-Peer Lending Business Models
  • 18.6 Credit Risk Assessment and Credit Defaults
  • 18.7 Divergence in Business Models Across Countries
  • 18.8 Arrival of Institutional Investors and Securitization
  • 18.9 Credit Bureaus and Credit Scoring
  • 18.10 Incumbents and Challengers
  • 18.11 Evolving Regulatory Landscape
  • 18.12 Growing Pains – The Shakedown in May 2016
  • 18.13 The Future of Peer-to-Peer Lending
  • References
  • EU VAT Implications of Crowdfunding
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 The Concept of Crowdfunding
  • 19.3 Crowdfunding in the European Union
  • 19.4 EU VAT System
  • 19.5 VAT Treatment of Crowdfunding Transactions
  • 19.6 Summary
  • References
  • Automated, Decentralized Trust: A Path to Financial Inclusion
  • 20.1 Setting the Stage
  • 20.2 Spiral Dynamics & Human Social Development
  • 20.3 Automated, Decentralized Trust Through Blockchain
  • 20.4 Financial Inclusion Through Decentralized, Automated Trust on Blockchains
  • 20.5 Summary
  • References