Wiley Clinical Psychology Handbooks: The Wiley Handbook of the Psychology of Mass Shootings

Editor/Author Wilson, Laura C.
Publication Year: 2017
Publisher: Wiley

Single-User Purchase Price: $195.00
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: $292.50
ISBN: 978-1-119-04793-3
Category: Psychology
Image Count: 2
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

The Wiley Handbook of the Psychology of Mass Shootings gathers together the latest insights from research and practice in one timely and much-needed reference work.

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Table of Contents

  • List of Tables
  • List of Illustrations
  • Notes on Contributors
  • Preface
  • Part I: Background on Mass Shootings
  • 1 Challenges to the Empirical Investigation of Mass Shootings
  • What Is a Mass Shooting?
  • What Are the Outcomes in Studies of the Psychological Effects of Mass Shootings?
  • What Processes Link Mass Shootings to Outcomes?
  • Challenges in Research Design and Theoretical Development
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • 2 The Patterns and Prevalence of Mass Public Shootings in the United States, 1915–2013
  • Mass Public Shooting Dataset
  • Mass Public Shootings in Context
  • The Prominence of Mass Public Shootings in the Social Construction of Mass Murder
  • Trends in the Prevalence of Mass Public Shootings
  • The Patterns of Mass Public Shootings
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • 3 Explaining Mass Shootings
  • Trends in Mass Shootings
  • Characteristics of Mass Shootings
  • A Typology of Mass Shootings
  • Explaining Multiple Murder
  • Discussion and Conclusion
  • References
  • Part II: The Psychology of Perpetrators
  • 4 The Development of Rampage Shooters
  • Previous Research on Mass Shooters
  • Difficulties in Identifying a Developmental Pathway
  • Purported Causal Factors That Are Not Supported
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • 5 Biosocial Perspective of Proactive Aggression
  • Biology and Aggression
  • Biosocial Model
  • Aggression Functional Subtypes: Proactive and Reactive
  • Biosocial Perspective and Proactive Aggression
  • Mass Shooters and Proactive Aggression: A Biosocial Framework
  • Implications
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • 6 The Challenge of Predicting Dangerousness
  • Challenge #1: The Question of Dangerousness
  • Challenge #2: The Evolution of Violence Prediction
  • Challenge #3: Correlates of Dangerousness
  • The Challenge Continues
  • References
  • Part III: The Role of Media in the Aftermath of Mass Shootings
  • 7 The Influence of Media on Public Attitudes
  • The Role of the Media in Agenda Setting
  • Prevalence of Media Coverage of Mass Shootings
  • The Gun Control Versus Right to Carry Debate
  • Mental Health and Mass Shooters
  • Perceptions of Safety and Fear of Crime
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • 8 Social Media and News Coverage as Vicarious Exposure
  • Direct Exposure to Trauma
  • Indirect Exposure to Trauma or Vicarious Trauma
  • Vicarious Exposure to Media Violence
  • Media Coverage of Mass Shootings
  • What We Know About Vicarious Exposure to Trauma
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • 9 The Role of Technology in Expressions of Grief
  • Stress, Dependencies, and Reliance on Media Technology
  • Media Use and Trauma: Vicarious Grief and Deleterious Effects
  • Social Media as an Alternative to Vicarious Grieving
  • Masspersonal Communication and Dialogue
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • 10 The Impact of Journalism on Grieving Communities
  • Mediatizing or Stigmatizing?
  • Mediatized Grief
  • Framing
  • The Role of Social Solidarity and How Journalism Affects It
  • Media Invading Community
  • Contact With Journalists and Survivors’ PTSS
  • Impact of News Coverage on PTSS Among Survivors and Surviving Communities
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Part IV: Psychological Considerations for Impacted Individuals
  • 11 Mental Health Outcomes Following Direct Exposure
  • State of the Literature
  • Definition of Exposure
  • Dose-Response Relationship
  • Type of Trauma
  • Mental Health Outcomes
  • Predictors of Mental Health Outcomes
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • 12 Psychosocial Functioning Within Shooting-Affected Communities
  • Prevalence of Adjustment Problems in Mass Shooting-Affected Communities
  • Predictors of Adjustment Problems Among Individuals Affected by a Mass Shooting
  • Improvements in Adjustment Following a Mass Shooting
  • Broader Community Changes Following a Mass Shooting
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • 13 Postdisaster Psychopathology Among Rescue Workers Responding to Multiple-Shooting Incidents
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • 14 Distress Among Journalists Working the Incidents
  • The Assignment
  • Long-Term Psychological Impairment in Journalists
  • Risk Factors for Psychological Impairment in Journalists
  • Resilience in Journalists
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Part V: Clinical Interventions for Impacted Individuals
  • 15 Empirically Based Trauma Therapies
  • Prolonged Exposure Therapy
  • Cognitive Processing Therapy
  • Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing
  • Detailed Case Example
  • Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • 16 Public Relief Efforts From an International Perspective
  • The Terror Killings of July 22, 2011
  • Present Chapter
  • The Development of Psychosocial Follow-Up for the Bereaved in Norway
  • Key Governmental Relief Efforts After the Terror of July 22, 2011
  • How Are the Bereaved Today?
  • What Will the Future Bring?
  • References
  • 17 Mental Health Service Utilization Following Mass Shootings
  • The Behavioral Model of Health Services
  • Factors and Mechanisms That May Confer Barriers to MH Service Use
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • 18 Resiliency and Posttraumatic Growth
  • De-Pathologizing Responses to Trauma
  • Information-Processing Models of PTSD
  • Neurobiology of PTSD
  • Recent Developments in “Fear Erasure”: Unknown Implications for Meaning Making and Posttraumatic Growth
  • Resilience
  • Protective Factors Conferring Resilience
  • Resilience as Adaptive Process
  • Posttraumatic Growth
  • Predictors of Posttraumatic Growth
  • Relationship of Posttraumatic Growth to Psychological Outcomes
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Part VI: Prevention, Ethics, and Future Directions
  • 19 Threat Assessment and Violence Prevention
  • Basic Principles
  • Threat Assessment as a Form of Risk Assessment
  • Violence Prevention Versus Prediction
  • Applications of Threat Assessment
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • 20 Ethical Conduct of Research in the Aftermath of Mass Shootings
  • Overview of General Issues for Victims and Impacted Communities
  • Overarching Concerns
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • 21 Future Directions
  • What Is Unique About Mass Shootings?
  • How Can We Minimize the Impact of Public Mass Shootings?
  • How Can We Minimize the Likelihood of Public Mass Shootings?
  • References