At a Glance: Medicines Management for Nurses at a Glance

Editor/Author Young, Simon and Pitcher, Ben
Publication Year: 2016
Publisher: Wiley

ISBN: 978-1-118-84072-6
Category: Health & Medicine - Nursing
Image Count: 72
Book Status: Pending
Predicted Release Month: March 2019
Table of Contents

Medicines Management for Nurses at a Glance is the perfect companion for study and revision for pre-registration nursing and healthcare students. Combining superb full colour illustrations with accessible and informative text, it provides an easy-to-read and supportive guide to the key pharmacological knowledge nursing students and registered nurses need to know.

Share this

Table of Contents

  • List of Tables
  • List of Illustrations
  • Preface
  • Part 1: Introduction to pharmacology and medicines management
  • Chapter 1: Why is managing medicines important in nursing?
  • Medicines management and nursing
  • Defining medicines management
  • Chapter 2: Keeping up to date with medicines management
  • Continuing professional development
  • Post-registration educational practice
  • Chapter 3: What is a medicine?
  • How are medicines developed and monitored?
  • Chapter 4: Medicines nomenclature: what's in a name?
  • Endings
  • Chapter 5: Numeracy and medicines management
  • Symbols
  • Illustrative biological unit standards for medicinal products
  • Chapter 6: Clinical pharmacokinetics I
  • Absorption
  • Distribution
  • Chapter 7: Clinical pharmacokinetics II
  • Metabolism
  • Excretion
  • Chapter 8: Routes of administration I
  • Oral
  • Intravenous
  • Intramuscular
  • Subcutaneous
  • Chapter 9: Routes of administration II
  • Inhaled
  • Topical
  • Transdermal
  • Sublingual
  • Rectal
  • Chapter 10: Pharmacodynamics I
  • What is pharmacodynamics?
  • Why do chemicals have such varied but specific effects on the body?
  • Receptors
  • Second messenger systems
  • Ion channels
  • Chapter 11: Pharmacodynamics II
  • Agonists and antagonists
  • Receptor specificity
  • Enzymes
  • Part 2: Managing medicines
  • Chapter 12: Dyspepsia
  • Dyspepsia
  • Antacids
  • Histamine (H2) antagonists
  • Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)
  • Chapter 13: Acute diarrhoea and constipation
  • Acute diarrhoea
  • Constipation
  • Chapter 14: Chronic bowel disease
  • Medications
  • Aminosalicylates
  • Corticosteroids
  • Immunoregulating agents
  • Chapter 15: Nausea and vomiting
  • Medications
  • Metoclopramide
  • Antihistamines
  • 5-HT3 receptor antagonists
  • Chapter 16: Anti-anginals
  • Indications
  • Nitrates
  • Calcium channel blockers
  • Chapter 17: Anti-arrhythmics
  • Digoxin
  • Amiodarone
  • Other anti-arrhythmic drugs
  • Chapter 18: Heart failure
  • Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors
  • Angiotensin-II receptor antagonists
  • Other drugs used in heart failure
  • Chapter 19: Hypertension
  • Drugs used to treat hypertension
  • Beta-blockers
  • Calcium channel blockers
  • Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBS)
  • Diuretics
  • Other drugs used in hypertension
  • Chapter 20: Diuretics
  • Pharmacodynamics
  • Chapter 21: Respiratory conditions I
  • Bronchodilators
  • Adrenoceptor agonists
  • Antimuscarinic bronchodilators
  • Theophylline and aminophylline
  • Inhaled corticosteroids
  • Leukotriene receptor antagonists
  • Chapter 22: Respiratory conditions II
  • Decongestants
  • Mucolytics
  • Antihistamines
  • Oxygen
  • Chapter 23: Opioid analgesics
  • Opioid analgesics
  • Commonly used opioid analgesics
  • Chapter 24: Anxiolytics and hypnotics
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Buspirone
  • Antidepressants and beta-blockers
  • Hypnotics – the ‘Z’ drugs (Zaleplon, Zopiclone and Zolpidem)
  • Chapter 25: Antipsychotics
  • First-and second-generation antipsychotics
  • Chapter 26: Depression
  • SSRIs
  • Tricyclic and related antidepressants
  • Other antidepressants
  • Chapter 27: Epilepsy
  • Anti-epileptic medication
  • Valproate
  • Carbamazepine
  • General advice
  • Chapter 28: Alcohol: detoxification
  • Medication that aids in the detoxification process
  • Thiamine and B vitamins
  • Chapter 29: Alcohol: maintaining abstinence
  • Acamprosate
  • Disulfiram
  • Naltrexone
  • Chapter 30: Smoking cessation
  • Pharmacodynamics
  • Pharmacokinetics
  • Chapter 31: Fighting infection
  • Bacteria
  • Viruses
  • Fungi
  • Other organisms
  • Chapter 32: Antibiotics
  • Penicillins
  • Cephalosporins
  • Other beta-lactam antibiotics
  • Beta-lactamases and inhibitors
  • Tetracyclines
  • Macrolides
  • Aminoglycosides
  • Metronidazole
  • Chapter 33: Diabetes: insulin
  • Insulins
  • Chapter 34: Diabetes: antiglycaemics
  • Biguanides
  • Sulfonylureas
  • ‘Other’ antidiabetics
  • Incretin mimetics
  • DPP-4 inhibitors
  • Pioglitazone (Actos®)
  • Chapter 35: Thyroid conditions
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Antithyroid drugs
  • Chapter 36: Oral contraception
  • Hormonal contraception
  • Medications
  • Chapter 37: Anticoagulants
  • Anticoagulants and the clotting cascade
  • Chapter 38: Antiplatelet drugs
  • Aspirin
  • Clopidogrel (Plavix®)
  • Dipyridamole
  • Other antiplatelets and anticoagulants
  • Chapter 39: Musculoskeletal disorders
  • Gout
  • Allopurinol
  • Colchicine
  • Chapter 40: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and non-opioid analgesics
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Details of common NSAIDs
  • Non-opioid analgesics
  • Chapter 41: Topical agents and emollients
  • Fingertip units
  • Emollients
  • Chapter 42: Topical steroids
  • Topical steroids combined with antimicrobial agents
  • Treatments for psoriasis
  • Part 3: Safe and effective medicines management
  • Chapter 43: Medicines management in pregnancy and breastfeeding
  • General principles to using medicines in pregnancy
  • General approaches to using medicines during breastfeeding
  • Chapter 44: Medicines management in children
  • Key medicines management issues for children
  • Chapter 45: Medicines management in elderly people
  • National Service Frameworks
  • Key medicines management issues for elderly patients
  • Ageing
  • Adherence
  • Chapter 46: Medicines management in people with hepatic and renal impairment
  • Managing medicines in hepatic impairment
  • Managing medicines in renal impairment
  • Examples of when drug and renal function are considered
  • Chapter 47: Drug interactions
  • Why are drug interactions important?
  • Classification of drug interactions
  • Underlying factors
  • Chapter 48: Adverse drug reactions
  • Why are adverse drug reactions important?
  • Classification of adverse drug reactions
  • The features of Type A reactions
  • The features of Type B reactions
  • Predisposing factors
  • Chapter 49: Pharmacovigilance
  • What is pharmacovigilance? Why is it important?
  • What methods are used to monitor the safety of medicines on the market?
  • Possible actions to be taken
  • Chapter 50: Classification of medicines
  • Classification of medicines in the UK
  • Controlled drugs