Introduction to Modern Virology

Editor/Author Dimmock, Nigel J., Easton, Andrew J. and Leppard, Keith N.
Publication Year: 2016
Publisher: Wiley

Single-User Purchase Price: $80.00
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: $120.00
ISBN: 978-1-119-97810-7
Category: Health & Medicine - Medicine
Image Count: 207
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

Praised forits clarity of presentation and accessibility, Introduction to Modern Virology has been a successful student text for over 30 years. It provides a broad introduction to virology, which includes the nature of viruses, the interaction of viruses with their hosts and the consequences of those interactions that lead to the diseases we see.

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Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Part I: The Nature of Viruses
  • Chapter 1: Towards a Definition of a Virus
  • 1.1 Discovery of Viruses
  • 1.2 Multiplication of Viruses
  • 1.3 The Virus Multiplication Cycle
  • 1.4 Viruses can be Defined in Chemical Terms
  • 1.5 Multiplication of Bacterial and Animal Viruses is Fundamentally Similar
  • 1.6 Viruses can be Manipulated Genetically
  • 1.7 Properties of Viruses
  • 1.8 Origin of Viruses
  • Key Points
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 2: The Structure of Virus Particles
  • 2.1 Virus Particles are Constructed from Subunits
  • 2.2 The Structure of Filamentous Viruses and Nucleoproteins
  • 2.3 The Structure is of Isometric Virus Particles
  • 2.4 Enveloped (Membrane-Bound) Virus Particles
  • 2.5 Virus Particles with Head-Tail Morphology
  • 2.6 Frequency of Occurrence of Different Virus Particle Morphologies
  • 2.7 Principles of Disassemply: Virus Particles are Metastable
  • Key Points
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 3: Classification of Viruses
  • 3.1 Classification on the Basis of Disease
  • 3.2 Classification on the Basis of Host Organism
  • 3.3 Classification on the Basis of Virus Particle Morphology
  • 3.4 Classification on the Basis of Viral Nucleic Acids
  • 3.5 Classification on the Basis of Taxonomy
  • 3.6 Satellites, Viroids and Prions
  • Key Points
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 4: The Evolution of Viruses
  • 4.1 Mechanisms of Virus Evolution
  • 4.2 The Potential for Rapid Evolution: Mutation and Quasispecies
  • 4.3 Rapid Evolution: Recombination
  • 4.4 Rapid Evolution: Reassortment
  • 4.5 Evolution to Find a Host, and Subsequent Co-Evolution with the Host
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 5: Techniques for Studying Viruses
  • 5.1 Culturing Wild Virus Isolates
  • 5.2 Enumeration of Viruses
  • 5.3 Measuring Infectious Virus Titres
  • 5.4 Measuring Physical Virus Titres
  • 5.5 Detecting Virus in a Sample
  • 5.6 Understanding Virus Replication Cycles
  • 5.7 Viral Genetics and Reverse Genetics
  • 5.8 Systems-Level Virology
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Part II: Virus Growth in Cells
  • Chapter 6: The Process of Infection: I. Virus Attachment and Entry into Cells
  • 6.1 Infection of Animal Cells: The Nature and Importance of Receptors
  • 6.2 Infection of Animal Cells: Enveloped Viruses
  • 6.3 Infection of Animal Cells: Non-Enveloped Viruses
  • 6.4 Infection of Plant Cells
  • 6.5 Infection of Bacteria
  • 6.6 Infection of Cells: Post-Entry Events
  • 6.7 Virus Entry: Cell Culture and the Whole Organism
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 7: The Process of Infection: IIA. The Replication of Viral DNA
  • 7.1 The Universal Mechanism of DNA Synthesis
  • 7.2 Replication of Circular Double-Stranded DNA Genomes
  • 7.3 Replication of Linear Double-Stranded DNA Genomes that can Form Circles
  • 7.4 Replication of Linear Double-Stranded DNA Genomes that do not Circularize
  • 7.5 Replication of Single-Stranded Circular DNA Genomes
  • 7.6 Replication of Single-Stranded Linear DNA Genomes
  • 7.7 Dependency versus Autonomy Among DNA Viruses
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 8: The Process of Infection: IIB. Genome Replication in RNA Viruses
  • 8.1 Nature and Diversity of RNA Virus Genomes
  • 8.2 Regulatory Elements for RNA Virus Genome Synthesis
  • 8.3 Synthesis of the RNA Genome of Baltimore Class 3 Viruses
  • 8.4 Synthesis of the RNA Genome of Baltimore Class 4 Viruses
  • 8.5 Synthesis of the RNA Genome of Baltimore Class 5 Viruses
  • 8.6 Synthesis of the RNA Genome of Viroids and Hepatitis Delta Virus
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 9: The Process of Infection: IIC. The Replication of RNA Viruses with a DNA Intermediate and Vice Versa
  • 9.1 The Retrovirus Replication Cycle
  • 9.2 Discovery of Reverse Transcription
  • 9.3 Retroviral Reverse Transcriptase
  • 9.4 Mechanism of Retroviral Reverse Transcription
  • 9.5 Integration of Retroviral DNA into Cell DNA
  • 9.6 Production of Retrovirus Progeny Genomes
  • 9.7 Spumaviruses: Retrovirus with Unusual Features
  • 9.8 The Hepadnavirus Replication Cycle
  • 9.9 Mechanism of Hepadnavirus Reverse Transcription
  • 9.10 Comparing Reverse Transcribing Viruses
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 10: The Process of Infection: IIIA. Gene Expression in DNA Viruses and Reverse-Transcribing Viruses
  • 10.1 The DNA Viruses and Retroviruses: Baltimore Classes 1, 2, 6 and 7
  • 10.2 Polyomaviruses
  • 10.3 Papillomaviruses
  • 10.4 Adenoviruses
  • 10.5 Herpesviruses
  • 10.6 Poxviruses
  • 10.7 Parvoviruses
  • 10.8 Retroviruses
  • 10.9 Hepadnaviruses
  • 10.10 DNA Bacteriophages
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 11: The Process of Infection: IIIB. Gene Expression and its Regulation in RNA Viruses
  • 11.1 The RNA Viruses: Baltimore Classes 3, 4 and 5
  • 11.2 Reoviruses
  • 11.3 Picornaviruses
  • 11.4 Alphaviruses
  • 11.5 Coronaviruses
  • 11.6 Negative Sense RNA viruses with Segmented Genomes
  • 11.7 Orthomyxoviruses
  • 11.8 Arenaviruses
  • 11.9 Negative Sense RNA Viruses with Non-Segmented, Single Stranded Genomes: Rhabdoviruses and Paramyxoviruses
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 12: The Process of Infection: IV. The Assembly of Viruses
  • 12.1 Self-Assembly from Mature Virion Components
  • 12.2 Assembly of Viruses with a Helical Structure
  • 12.3 Assembly of Viruses with an Isometric Structure
  • 12.4 Assembly of Complex Viruses
  • 12.5 Sequence-Dependent and -Independent Packaging of Virus DNA in Virus Particles
  • 12.6 The Assembly of Enveloped Viruses
  • 12.7 Segmented Virus Genomes: The Acquisition of Multiple Nucleic Acid Molecules
  • 12.8 Maturation of Virus Particles
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Part III: Virus Interactions with the Whole Organism
  • Chapter 13: Innate and Intrinsic Immunity
  • 13.1 Innate Immune Responses in Vertebrates – Discovery of Interferon
  • 13.2 Induction of Type 1 Interferon Responses
  • 13.3 Virus Countermeasures to Innate Immunity
  • 13.4 TRIM Proteins and Immunity
  • 13.5 Intrinsic Resistance to Viruses in Vertebrates
  • 13.6 Innate and Intrinsic Immunity and the Outcome of Infection
  • 13.7 RNAi is an Important Antiviral Mechanism in Invertebrates and Plants
  • 13.8 Detecting and Signalling Infection in Invertebrates and Plants
  • 13.9 Virus Resistance Mechanisms in Bacteria and Archaea
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • References
  • Chapter 14: The Adaptive Immune Response
  • 14.1 General Features of the Adaptive Immune System
  • 14.2 Cell-Mediated Immunity
  • 14.3 Antibody-Mediated Humoral Immunity
  • 14.4 Virus Evasion of Adaptive Immunity
  • 14.5 Age and Adaptive Immunity
  • 14.6 Interaction Between the Innate and Adaptive Immune Systems
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 15: Interactions between Animal Viruses and Cells
  • 15.1 Acutely Cytopathogenic Infections
  • 15.2 Persistent Infections
  • 15.3 Latent Infections
  • 15.4 Transforming Infections
  • 15.5 Abortive Infections
  • 15.6 Null Infections
  • 15.7 How do Animal Viruses Kill Cells?
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 16: Animal Virus–Host Interactions
  • 16.1 Cause and Effect: Koch's Postulates
  • 16.2 A Classification of Virus–Host Interactions
  • 16.3 Acute Infections
  • 16.4 Subclinical Infections
  • 16.5 Persistent and Chronic Infections
  • 16.6 Latent Infections
  • 16.7 Slowly Progressive Diseases
  • 16.8 Virus-Induced Tumours
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 17: Mechanisms in Virus Latency
  • 17.1 The Latent Interaction of Virus and Host
  • 17.2 Gene Expression and the Lytic and Lysogenic Life of Bacteriophage λ
  • 17.3 Herpes Simplex Virus Latency
  • 17.4 Epstein-Barr Virus Latency
  • 17.5 Latency in Other Herpesviruses
  • 17.6 HIV-1 Latency
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 18: Transmission of Viruses
  • 18.1 Virus Transmission Cycles
  • 18.2 Barriers to Transmission
  • 18.3 Routes of Horizontal Transmission in Animals
  • 18.4 Vertical Transmission
  • 18.5 Vector-Borne Viruses and Zoonotic Transmission
  • 18.6 Epidemiology of Virus Infections
  • 18.7 Sustaining Infection in Populations
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Part IV: Viruses and Human Disease
  • Chapter 19: Human Viral Disease: An Overview
  • 19.1 A Survey of Human Viral Pathogens
  • 19.2 Factors Affecting the Relative Incidence of Viral Disease
  • 19.3 Factors Determining the Nature and Severity of Viral Disease
  • 19.4 Common Signs and Symptoms of Viral Infection
  • 19.5 Acute Viral Infection 1: Gastrointestinal Infections
  • 19.6 Acute Viral Infection 2: Respiratory Infections
  • 19.7 Acute Viral Infection 3: Systemic Spread
  • 19.8 Acute Viral Disease: Conclusions
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 20: Influenza Virus Infection
  • 20.1 The Origins of Human Influenza Viruses
  • 20.2 Influenza Virus Replication
  • 20.3 Influenza Virus Infection and Disease
  • 20.4 Virus Determinants of Disease
  • 20.5 Host Factors in Influenza Virus Disease
  • 20.6 The Immune Response and Influenza Virus
  • 20.7 Anti-Influenza Treatment
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 21: HIV and AIDS
  • 21.1 Origins and Spread of the HIV Pandemic
  • 21.2 Molecular Biology of HIV
  • 21.3 HIV Transmission and Tropism
  • 21.4 Course of HIV Infection: Pathogenesis and Disease
  • 21.5 Immunological Abnormalities during HIV Infection
  • 21.6 Prevention and Control of HIV Infection
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 22: Viral Hepatitis
  • 22.1 The Signs and Symptoms of Hepatitis
  • 22.2 Hepatitis A Virus Infections
  • 22.3 Hepatitis E Virus Infections
  • 22.4 Hepatitis B Virus Infections
  • 22.5 Hepatitis D Virus Infections
  • 22.6 Hepatitis C Virus Infections
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 23: Vector-Borne Infections
  • 23.1 Arboviruses and Their Hosts
  • 23.2 Yellow Fever Virus
  • 23.3 Dengue Virus
  • 23.4 Chikungunya Virus
  • 23.5 West Nile Virus in the USA
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 24: Exotic and Emerging Viral Infections
  • 24.1 Ebola and Marburg Viruses: Emerging Filoviruses
  • 24.2 Hendra and Nipah Viruses: Emerging Paramyxoviruses
  • 24.3 SARS and MERS: Emerging Coronaviruses
  • 24.4 Predicting the Future: Clues from Analysis of the Genomes of Previously Unknown Viruses
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 25: Carcinogenesis and Tumour Viruses
  • 25.1 Immortalization, Transformation and Tumourigenesis
  • 25.2 Oncogenic Viruses
  • 25.3 Polyomaviruses, Papillomaviruses and Adenoviruses: The Small DNA Tumour Viruses as Experimental Models
  • 25.4 Papillomaviruses and Human Cancer
  • 25.5 Polyomaviruses and Human Cancer
  • 25.6 Herpesvirus Involvement in Human Cancers
  • 25.7 Retroviruses as Experimental Model Tumour Viruses
  • 25.8 Retroviruses and Naturally-Occurring Tumours
  • 25.9 Hepatitis Viruses and Liver Cancer
  • 25.10 Prospects for the Control of Virus-Associated Cancers
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 26: Vaccines and Immunotherapy: The Prevention of Virus Diseases
  • 26.1 The Principles of Vaccination
  • 26.2 Whole Virus Vaccines
  • 26.3 Advantages, Disadvantages and Difficulties Associated with Whole Virus Vaccines
  • 26.4 Subunit Vaccines
  • 26.5 Advantages, Disadvantages and Difficulties Associated with Subunit Vaccines
  • 26.6 Considerations for the Generation and Use of Vaccines
  • 26.7 Adverse Reactions and Clinical Complications with Vaccines
  • 26.8 Eradication of Virus Diseases by Vaccination
  • 26.9 Immunotherapy for Virus Infections
  • 26.10 Adverse Reactions and Clinical Complications with Immunotherapy
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 27: Antiviral Therapy
  • 27.1 Scope and Limitations of Antiviral Therapy
  • 27.2 Antiviral Therapy for Herpesvirus Infections
  • 27.3 Antiviral Therapy for Influenza Virus Infections
  • 27.4 Antiviral Therapy for HIV Infections
  • 27.5 Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis Virus Infections
  • 27.6 Therapy for Other Virus Infections
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 28: Prion Diseases
  • 28.1 The Spectrum of Prion Diseases
  • 28.2 The Prion Hypothesis
  • 28.3 The Aetiology of Prion Diseases
  • 28.4 Prion Disease Pathogenesis
  • 28.5 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)
  • 28.6 BSE and the Emergence of Variant CJD
  • 28.7 Concerns About Variant CJD in the Future
  • 28.8 Unresolved Issues
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Part V: Virology – the Wider Context
  • Chapter 29: The Economic Impact of Viruses
  • 29.1 The Economics of Virus Infections of Humans
  • 29.2 The Economics of Virus Infections of Animals
  • 29.3 The Economics of Virus Infections of Plants
  • 29.4 The Netherlands Tulip Market Crash
  • Key Points
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 30: Recombinant Viruses: Making Viruses Work for Us
  • 30.1 Recombinant Viruses as Vaccines
  • 30.2 Recombinant Viruses for Gene Therapy
  • 30.3 Retroviral Vectors for Gene Therapy
  • 30.4 Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy
  • 30.5 Parvovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy
  • 30.6 Oncolytic Viruses for Cancer Therapy
  • 30.7 Recombinant Viruses in the Laboratory
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 31: Viruses: Shaping the Planet
  • 31.1 Virus Infections can Give a Host an Evolutionary Advantage
  • 31.2 Endogenous Retroviruses and Host Biology
  • 31.3 Bacteriophage can be Pathogenicity Determinants for Their Hosts
  • 31.4 Cyanophage Impacts on Carbon Fixation and Oceanic Ecosystems
  • 31.5 Virology and Society: For Good or Ill
  • Key Points
  • Questions
  • Further Reading