Wiley Blackwell Companions to Religion: The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Religion and Politics in the U.S.

Editor: McGraw, Barbara A.
Publication Year: 2016
Publisher: Wiley

Single-User Purchase Price: $195.00
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: $292.50
ISBN: 978-0-47-065733-1
Category: Religion & Theology
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Religion and Politics in the U.S. provides a broad, inclusive, and rich range of chapters, in the study of religion and politics. Arranged in their historical context, chapters address themes of history, law, social and religious movements, policy and political theory.

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Table of Contents

  • Notes on Contributors
  • Preface
  • References
  • Acknowledgments
  • Part I: Foundations and the Founding
  • Introduction to Part I
  • CHAPTER 1: Original Nations of “Great Turtle Island” and the Genesis of the United States
  • A View from the Shore of Great Turtle Island (“North America”)
  • The Book of Genesis and the Genesis of the Theology of Domination
  • The Genesis of the Doctrine of Christian Discovery
  • Symbol, Ritual, and Imagination in the Presumed Right of Sovereignty
  • The Territories of Original Nations: A “Promised Land” for the United States
  • Johnson v. M’Intosh: The Doctrine of Discovery Becomes a Basis for US Law
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 2: The Intellectual Foundation and Political Construction of American Religious Pluralism
  • Toward the Demise of the New “Old World”
  • Intellectual Foundation of Modern Political Construction
  • Political Construction of Religious Pluralism
  • Aftermath of the Political Construction of Religious Pluralism
  • Paradox of Pluralism
  • References
  • CHAPTER 3: Religion and the Foundations of Slavery in America
  • Religion and the Creation of Slavery in the American Colonies
  • Religion and Anti-Slavery in America Up to the Revolutionary Period
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 4: Roger Williams, Native Peoples, and “Soul Liberty”
  • The Thoughts of Williams
  • “Christian Values” and Native Peoples
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 5: Were Any of the Founders Deists?
  • Civic Leaders Who Publicly Embraced Deism
  • Civic Leaders Who Privately Embraced Deism
  • Other Possibilities
  • But Were Even a Handful of Founders Deists?
  • God Words?
  • A Representative Sample?
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • CHAPTER 6: The Heterodox Republic Part I
  • The Religion of Nature and of Nature’s God
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 7: The Heterodox Republic Part II
  • The American Reformation
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 8: How the Founders Agreed about Religious Freedom but Disagreed about the Separation of Church and State
  • The Founders’ Agreement: The Natural Right to Religious Freedom
  • The Founders’ Disagreement: How to Separate Church from State in Order to Protect Religious Liberty
  • References
  • CHAPTER 9: Religion and the Earliest Supreme Court Justices, 1789–1811
  • Religion in Biography
  • Natural Law As Public Law
  • Natural Law and the Court
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Part II: Challenges to an Assumed Homogeneity
  • Introduction to Part II
  • CHAPTER 10: Millennial Groups and American Pluralism
  • The Millennial Imagination
  • Toward a Protestant Commonwealth
  • The Callous Side of Democracy: Separatism or Withdrawal
  • Mormon Withdrawal
  • Legacy of Religious Pluralism
  • References
  • CHAPTER 11: Religion and the Nineteenth-Century Supreme Court, 1811–78
  • Religion in Biography
  • Justice Joseph Story, Christianity, and the Law
  • Justice Story’s Impact on Decisions Involving Religion
  • Post-Story Decisions on Religion
  • Conclusions: The Turning Tide
  • References
  • CHAPTER 12: Native Americans, Christian Missionaries, and the Politics of the Forced School Movement
  • References
  • CHAPTER 13: Preserving the Protestant Nation
  • Religion and the Founding of the Nation
  • The Early National Period and Populist Protestantism
  • The First Wave of Non-Protestant Immigrants
  • The Classic Era of Immigration – The So-Called “Second Wave”
  • Conclusion: Saving the Protestant Nation
  • References
  • CHAPTER 14: New Religions and New Politics in Nineteenth-Century America
  • Founding Freemasons
  • Anti-Slavery and Workingmen’s Magic
  • Esoteric Communalism
  • The Flowering of Spiritualism
  • Theosophy and Nationalism
  • The Politics of New Thought
  • Metaphysical Socialism
  • References
  • CHAPTER 15: Religion and the Politics of the Women’s Movement in Nineteenth-Century America
  • Shifting Historiographical Paradigms
  • The Religious Origins of Political Feminism
  • Abolitionism: The Power of Agitation
  • Religious Dissent and Feminist Politics
  • The Overlapping Authorities of Church and State
  • Spiritualism and the Women’s Movement
  • The Politics of Women’s Moral Authority
  • Radical Feminist Theologies
  • A Divided Legacy
  • References
  • CHAPTER 16: Religion and Slavery in Antebellum America
  • The Emergency of the Antebellum Anti-Slavery Movement
  • Pro-Slavery Religious Thought and Race
  • Citing the Bible to Justify Slavery
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 17: The Peak of American Political Religion
  • Lincoln’s Early Religious Views
  • Providentialism in the Nineteenth Century
  • The Second Inaugural Address: Lincoln’s Providentialism
  • The Second Inaugural and Reconstruction
  • On Lincoln’s Political Theology
  • References
  • CHAPTER 18: Completing the Constitution
  • Introduction: The Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment
  • Pre-Civil War Historical Context
  • Post-Civil War Historical Context and the Fourteenth Amendment
  • Following the Passage of the Fourteenth Amendment
  • Interpreting the Fourteenth Amendment
  • “Completing” the Constitution
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 19: Preserving Morality in an Urban Nation
  • Post-Civil War Social Problems: The Gilded Age and Redemption
  • Temperance
  • Anti-Vice Campaigns
  • The Social Gospel and Muscular Christianity
  • Conclusion: The Great War and the Legacy of Progressive-Era Reform
  • References
  • Part III: Political Religion Rising, Retrenching, Resurging
  • Introduction to Part III
  • CHAPTER 20: Religion and Political Thought in the Twentieth Century
  • John Dewey and the Secularized Imagination
  • Political Liberalism and the Recovery of the Religion Question
  • The Return of (De-Secularized) Political Theology
  • At Century’s End: A Political Theology or Theological Political Theory?
  • References
  • CHAPTER 21: The Religious Left Tradition in Twentieth-Century America
  • Rise: 1900–1940
  • Disruption: 1940–1955
  • Revival: 1955–1980
  • Persistence: 1980–2000
  • References
  • CHAPTER 22: The Religious Right in the Twentieth Century
  • Creation
  • Mobilization
  • Reconstitution
  • Continuation
  • References
  • CHAPTER 23: Religion and Immigration Post-1965
  • Religion in American Life and Culture – the Rival Stories
  • The 1920 to 1965 Period: Immigration Hiatus
  • Social, Cultural, and Immigration Changes Post-1965
  • Religion in the Current Political Landscape of Immigration
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 24: Ending the Ban on Indigenous Spiritualities
  • References
  • CHAPTER 25: The Black Church and Political Activism in Twentieth-Century America
  • Black Churches Engaging the Public Square
  • Political Engagement for Economic Progress
  • Political Activism for Environmental Justice
  • Limitations of Black Church Activism
  • References
  • CHAPTER 26: New Religious Movements and Politics in the Twentieth Century
  • Controversial Politically Active Groups
  • Groups Testing the Boundaries of Free Exercise of Religion
  • Groups That Provoke Social Controversy
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 27: Women, Politics, and Religion in the Twentieth Century
  • The Politics of Virtue in the Early Twentieth Century
  • Second-Wave Feminism, Anti-Feminism, and Religion
  • Religion and the Question of Women's Power
  • References
  • CHAPTER 28: Themes in the US Supreme Court’s Treatment of Religion in the Twentieth Century
  • Separation of Church and State
  • Cooperation between Sacred and Secular
  • Integration of Religion and Politics
  • Accommodation of Civil Religion
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 29: Religion and the Rise of Environmental Politics in the Twentieth Century
  • Background: Religion, Nature, and Politics from First Contacts through the Nineteenth Century
  • Environmental Politics from the Turn of the Twentieth Century to Earth Day: The Increasing Influence of Science and the Widespread Emergence of Activism
  • Religion, Nature, and Politics from Earth Day to Climate Activism
  • Conclusion: The Contested Terrain of Religion and Environmental Politics in the Twentieth Century
  • References
  • CHAPTER 30: Religion and Realism
  • Wilsonianism and World War I
  • World War II and the Cold War
  • The United States and Israel
  • Democratic Universalism in the Post-Cold War Era
  • A Clash of Civilizations at the Dawn of a New Century?
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Part IV: Twenty-First Century Trends and Special Topics
  • Introduction to Part IV
  • CHAPTER 31: The Politics of Moral Values
  • The Religious Part of the Equation
  • The Moral Political Symbiosis
  • From Symbiosis to Backlash
  • The Moral Religious Debate Influencing the Twenty-First Century
  • References
  • CHAPTER 32: The Religion Clauses in the Twenty-First Century
  • Limiting the Limits of Religious Establishment
  • The Limited Scope of the Free Exercise Clause
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • CHAPTER 33: Trending
  • Migration
  • Ministry
  • Media
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 34: Contemporary Ethno-Religious Groups and Political Activism in the United States
  • Ethnicity and the Political Mobilization of Immigrants
  • Religion and the Political Mobilization of Immigrants
  • Methods and Data
  • Background to the Research
  • Religion and Activism: Foreign Policy
  • Religion and Activism: Domestic Policy
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 35: Religious Influences on Catholic and Jewish Supreme Court Justices
  • Introduction
  • Religion Issues and the Current Supreme Court
  • Catholic–Jewish Differences among Elites
  • The Establishment Clause and Public Opinion
  • Explaining Catholic–Jewish Differences
  • The Exceptions
  • References
  • CHAPTER 36: Trends in Religion and Environmental Politics into the Twenty-First Century
  • Christianity and Environmental Issues in the United States
  • The Influence of, and Reactions to, Popular Expressions of Green Religion and Ethics
  • International Environmental Activities and Political Engagement in the United States
  • Future Scenarios: Toward a Global Ecological Civil Religion?
  • References
  • CHAPTER 37: Engaging Religion in US Foreign Affairs
  • The Absence of Religion
  • Religious Engagement during the Clinton and Bush Years
  • Religious Engagement during the Obama Presidency
  • Criticisms of Government Engagement with Religion
  • Establishment Clause Constraints?
  • Conclusion: The Promising Future
  • References
  • CHAPTER 38: America’s Missions
  • The “Mission” of US Foreign Policy
  • The “Missions” of Other Political Actors
  • The Future of US Foreign Policy and Religion
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 39: Religion, State, and Democracy
  • Religion, State, and Democracy’s Twin Tolerations
  • Democratic Models of Religion and State and Their Consequences beyond the United States
  • Implications for US Foreign Policy-Making
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • CHAPTER 40: Religious Pluralism at the Crossroads
  • From Protestant Hegemony to Religious Pluralism
  • A Quiet Revolution
  • Religious Liberty and Conservative Christians
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References