Foodborne Diseases: Case Studies of Outbreaks in the Agri-Food Industries

Editors: Soon, Jan Mei, Manning, Louise and Wallace, Carol A.
Publication Year: 2016
Publisher: CRC Press

Single-User Purchase Price: $239.95
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: Not Available
ISBN: 978-1-48-220827-6
Category: Health & Medicine - Health
Image Count: 45
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

Foodborne Diseases: Case Studies of Outbreaks in the Agri-Food Industries defines the context of foodborne disease across a range of food sectors. It provides insight into the causes and management of outbreaks along with practical lessons about foodborne disease prevention strategies relevant to stakeholders throughout the food supply chain.

Share this

This book is found in the following Credo Collections:

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Editors
  • Contributors
  • Chapter 1 Foodborne Disease Outbreaks: An Introduction - Louise Manning, Carol A. Wallace, and Jan Mei Soon
  • References
  • Chapter 2 Foodborne Disease Surveillance Systems: Early Warning Alert and Response Methods for Developing Countries - Jan Mei Soon, Louise Manning, and Carol A. Wallace
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Foodborne Disease Surveillance Systems
  • 2.2.1 Rumor Surveillance
  • 2.2.2 Geographical Information System (GIS) in the Field of Foodborne Diseases
  • 2.2.3 Syndromic Surveillance
  • 2.2.4 Surveillance of the Escherichia coli O104:H4 Outbreak in Germany Using Web Queries Data
  • 2.3 Incidence of Web Search Queries in Specific FBD Incidents in Malaysia … .
  • 2.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3 Foodborne Outbreaks and Potential Routes of Contamination in Fresh and Fresh-Cut Fruits and Vegetables - Manan Sharma, David Ingram, and Lorna Graham
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Outbreaks of Foodborne Illness Associated with Tropical and Subtropical Fruits
  • 3.2.1 Outbreaks Associated with Mangoes and Papayas
  • 3.2.2 Outbreaks Associated with Citrus
  • 3.2.3 Outbreaks Associated with Melons
  • 3.2.4 Other Tropical Fruits Associated with Outbreaks
  • 3.2.5 Outbreaks Associated with Leafy Greens in the United States
  • 3.3 Routes of Contamination of Tropical Fruits
  • 3.3.1 Routes of Contamination of Mangoes
  • 3.3.2 Routes of Contamination of Citrus
  • 3.3.3 Routes of Contamination of Melons
  • 3.4 Food Safety Programs Used to Minimize Microbial Contamination of Fruits
  • 3.4.1 Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs)
  • 3.4.2 Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCPs)
  • 3.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4 Microbiological Outbreak in Sprouted Seeds - Lynn McIntyre and James Monaghan
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Epidemiological Investigation
  • 4.2.1 Setting the Scene (Case Numbers, Deaths, and Countries Affected) …
  • 4.2.2 Identification and Characterization of the Outbreak Strain
  • 4.3 Outbreak Management and Trace-Back (What Was Done to Prevent Further Cross-Contamination and to Minimize the Number of Cases)
  • 4.3.1 Early Confusion as to the Source of Illness Led to General Advice, Reducing Customer's Confidence and Sales of Fruits and Vegetables
  • 4.3.2 Sprouted Seeds Identified Indirectly as a Vehicle of Infection
  • 4.3.2.1 Advice Not to Consume or Sell Raw Sprouts and Shoots …
  • 4.3.2.2 Advice to Destroy Seeds Held for Domestic Sprouting
  • 4.3.2.3 Suspected Seeds Removed from the Food Chain
  • 4.3.2.4 Import Restrictions Imposed on Egyptian Seeds
  • 4.3.3 Review of Production Systems and Safety Systems
  • 4.3.3.1 Understanding the Scale of the Sector
  • 4.3.4 What Supply Chain Standards Were Applied at the Time of the Outbreak?
  • 4.3.4.1 EU Food Law
  • 4.3.4.2 Codex Alimentarius: Code of Hygienic Practice for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables and Annex II (CAC/RCP 53-2003)
  • 4.3.4.3 Quality Assurance Schemes
  • 4.3.5 How Standards Were Changed
  • 4.3.5.1 EU Regulations
  • 4.3.5.2 Industry Guidelines/QAS
  • 4.4 Lessons Learned/Prevention Strategies/Directions for Future Epidemiological Investigations
  • 4.4.1 Lessons Learned
  • 4.4.2 Prevention
  • 4.4.3 Directions for Future Epidemiological Investigations
  • References
  • Chapter 5 Microbiological Hazard Outbreaks in Nuts and Nuts-Related Food - You Li and Keith R. Schneider
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Nut-Associated Foodborne Outbreaks
  • 5.2.1 Almonds
  • 5.2.2 Coconuts and Coconut Products
  • 5.2.3 Hazelnuts
  • 5.2.4 Peanuts and Peanut Products
  • 5.2.5 Pine Nuts
  • 5.2.6 Pistachio Nuts
  • 5.2.7 Sesame Seeds
  • 5.3 Discussion
  • 5.4 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 6 Campylobacter in Poultry: The Conundrums of Highly Adaptable and Ubiquitous Foodborne Pathogens - Issmat I. Kassem, Olugbenga Kehinde, Yosra A. Helmy, Ruby Pina-Mimbela, Anand Kumar, Kshipra Chandrashekhar, and Gireesh Rajashekara
  • 6.1 Campylobacter in Brief
  • 6.2 Epidemiology and Outbreaks of Campylobacter at a Glance
  • 6.3 Importance of Investigating Campylobacter in the Broiler Farm Environment
  • 6.4 Campylobacter on the Farm
  • 6.5 Campylobacter in the Chicken Host
  • 6.6 Control of Campylobacter in Poultry
  • 6.6.1 Postharvest Control of Campylobacter in Poultry Products
  • 6.6.2 Preharvest Control of Campylobacter in Poultry
  • 6.6.2.1 Biosecurity and Hygiene
  • 6.6.2.2 Drinking Water, Litter Treatments, and Feed Additives
  • 6.6.2.3 Application of Bacteriophages
  • 6.6.2.4 Other Potential Control Approaches
  • 6.7 Concluding Remarks
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 7 Surveillance for Evidence-Based Risk Management of Salmonella in the Australian Pork Industry - Andrew Pointon
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Hazard Identification
  • 7.2.1 Hazards and Potential Hazards
  • 7.2.2 Reported Public Health Outbreaks Attributed to Pork
  • 7.2.3 Trends in Surveillance Data: Isolates from Humans and Pigs
  • 7.2.4 Key Findings and Implications
  • 7.3 Exposure Assessment
  • 7.3.1 Exposure of Pigs
  • 7.3.1.1 Inputs: Feeds
  • 7.3.1.2 Herd Serological Profile across Industry
  • 7.3.1.3 Laboratory Isolates from Pig Samples (2006-2013)
  • 7.3.1.4 On-Farm Risk Factors
  • 7.3.1.5 Ecology of Infection in the Predominant Production Systems
  • 7.3.1.6 Effect of Transport/Lairaging
  • 7.3.1.7 Prevalence in Pigs at Slaughter
  • 7.3.2 Exposure of Carcasses
  • 7.3.2.1 Serovar Pull-Through from Farm to Carcass
  • 7.3.2.2 Carcass-Monitoring Data and Trends
  • 7.3.3 Exposure of Products
  • 7.3.3.1 Product Performance Objectives
  • 7.3.4 Key Findings
  • 7.4 Risk Management
  • 7.4.1 Industry Risk Management Policy Determination
  • 7.4.2 Review of Risk Assessments
  • 7.4.3 Interventions
  • 7.4.3.1 Abattoir Performance
  • 7.4.3.2 Carcass Decontamination
  • 7.4.3.3 Performance Objectives on Boned Cuts and the Shift to Process Control
  • 7.5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 8 Microbiological Outbreaks in Dairy: Concerted Efforts Are Required to Meet the Challenges of a Listeriosis Outbreak–Lessons Learned1 - Dagmar Schoder and Martin Wagner
  • 8.1 Introduction and Background
  • 8.1.1 Listeriosis Background
  • 8.1.2 Regulatory Framework
  • 8.1.3 Archival Pointers
  • 8.2 What Made Outbreak Investigations Difficult?
  • 8.2.1 Finding the Source Directly from Patients
  • 8.2.2 Resolution and Outcomes
  • 8.2.3 Epidemiology Did the Job
  • 8.2.4 What Is Quargel Cheese?
  • 8.2.5 Quargel Recall and Sample Contamination
  • 8.2.6 Revelations from the Samples and Production Plant
  • 8.2.7 At-Site Contamination and Isolate Match
  • 8.2.8 Insects as Possible Vectors
  • 8.2.9 Modeling and Assessing In-House Monitoring
  • 8.3 Reconsideration of Legal Stipulations
  • 8.4 Reflections for the Future
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 9 Case Study of an Outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis Associated with Shell Eggs and Egg-Containing Products - Corliss A. O'Bryan, Philip G. Crandall, and Steven C. Ricke
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Epidemiological Investigation
  • 9.2.1 Methods of Typing and Subtyping Isolates
  • 9.2.2 PulseNet
  • 9.2.3 PFGE Patterns of S. Enteritidis
  • 9.3 Investigation of an Egg-Related Outbreak of S. Enteritidis in the United States
  • 9.3.1 California Investigation
  • 9.3.2 Minnesota Investigation
  • 9.3.3 Colorado Investigation
  • 9.3.4 Overall Outbreak Information
  • 9.4 Traceback Investigation
  • 9.5 Consequences of the Outbreak
  • 9.5.1 Consumer Response
  • 9.5.2 Subtyping Methods
  • 9.5.3 Changes in Government Regulations
  • 9.5.3.1 Refrigeration of Eggs
  • 9.5.3.2 Biosecurity
  • 9.5.3.3 Testing for S. Enteritidis
  • 9.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 10 Microbiological and Toxin Outbreaks in Seafood1 - Chris Rodgers and Jorge Diogène
  • 10.1 Seafood, a High-Value Resource with Beneficial Properties but Requiring Preventive Controls
  • 10.1.1 Background
  • 10.1.2 Potential Risk of Seafood
  • 10.2 Case Studies for Microbiological Hazards in Seafood
  • 10.2.1 Fecal Bacterial Infections
  • 10.2.1.1 Campylobacter spp
  • 10.2.1.2 Escherichia coli
  • 10.2.1.3 Salmonella spp
  • 10.2.1.4 Shigella spp
  • 10.2.1.5 Yersinia enterocolitica
  • 10.2.2 Nonfecal Bacterial Infections
  • 10.2.2.1 Clostridium botulinum
  • 10.2.2.2 Listeria monocytogenes
  • 10.2.2.3 Vibrio spp
  • 10.2.3 Human Virus Infections
  • 10.2.3.1 Norovirus (NoV) Case Study
  • 10.2.3.2 Examples of Recent Norovirus Outbreaks
  • 10.2.3.3 Hepatitis Virus (HAV)
  • 10.2.3.4 Other Enteric Viruses
  • 10.2.3.5 Fecal Indicators and Enteric Viruses
  • 10.2.3.6 Alternative Indicators
  • 10.3 Case Studies for Marine Toxins in Seafood
  • 10.3.1 Types of Seafood Poisoning Associated with Marine Toxins
  • 10.3.1.1 Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP)
  • 10.3.1.2 Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP)
  • 10.3.1.3 Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP)
  • 10.3.1.4 Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning (NSP)
  • 10.3.1.5 Ciguatera Fish Poisoning
  • 10.3.1.6 Palytoxin (PLTX) Seafood Poisoning
  • 10.3.1.7 Concluding Remarks
  • 10.3.2 Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP) Case Study
  • 10.3.2.1 First Poisonings and Alerts
  • 10.3.2.2 Description of the ASP Symptoms during the First Reported Case
  • 10.3.2.3 Identification of the Etiology of ASP
  • 10.3.2.4 Research That Followed the Prince Edward Island Event …
  • 10.3.2.5 Present Management Actions for ASP
  • 10.3.3 Ciguatera Case Studies
  • 10.3.3.1 Ciguatera Fish Poisoning
  • 10.3.3.2 Chronology of Ciguatera Studies
  • 10.3.3.3 Current Needs and Present Management Actions for Ciguatera
  • 10.4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 11 Foodborne Disease Outbreaks in Meat from Wild Game and Bushmeat - Peter Paulsen, Alessandra Avagnina, Frans J.M. Smulders, and Kashif Nauman
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Hazards Associated with Meat from Wild Game and Bushmeat
  • 11.2.1 Viral Agents: Hepatitis E Virus
  • 11.2.1.1 Description of the Hazard
  • 11.2.1.2 HEV and Game Meat
  • 11.2.1.3 Control of the Hazard
  • 11.2.2 Parasitic Agents: Toxoplasma
  • 11.2.2.1 Description of the Hazard
  • 11.2.2.2 Toxoplasma and Game Meat
  • 11.2.2.3 Control of the Hazard
  • 11.2.3 Parasitic Agents: Trichinella
  • 11.2.3.1 Description of the Hazard
  • 11.2.3.2 Trichinella and Game Meat
  • 11.2.3.3 Control of the Hazard
  • 11.3 Chemical Hazards: Lead
  • 11.3.1 Description of the Hazard and Its Relation to Wild Game
  • 11.3.2 Control of the Hazard
  • 11.4 Concluding Remark
  • References
  • Chapter 12 Mycotoxin Outbreak in Animal Feed - Sophal Cheat, Isabelle P. Oswald, and Martine Kolf-Clauw
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Mycotoxin Occurrence
  • 12.2.1 Origins of Mycotoxin and Occurrence
  • 12.2.1.1 Fungal Species
  • 12.2.1.2 Toxinogenesis: Conditions Favoring Mycotoxin Production
  • 12.2.1.3 Mycotoxins in Feed
  • 12.2.2 Mycotoxin Contamination of Feedstuffs
  • 12.3 Mycotoxins and Pathologies
  • 12.3.1 Mycotoxins and Livestock Diseases
  • 12.3.1.1 Aflatoxins
  • 12.3.1.2 Deoxynivalenol
  • 12.3.1.3 Fumonisins
  • 12.3.1.4 Ochratoxins
  • 12.3.1.5 Zearalenone
  • 12.3.2 Diagnoses of Mycotoxicosis
  • 12.3.3 Field Cases
  • 12.4 Mycotoxins and Animal Productivities
  • 12.4.1 Feed Intake
  • 12.4.2 Animal Reproduction
  • 12.4.3 Animal Immunomodulation
  • 12.4.4 Economic Impacts of Mycotoxin
  • 12.4.4.1 Feed Securities
  • 12.4.4.2 Tissue Residues
  • 12.5 Strategies for Prevention and Management
  • 12.5.1 Agricultural Practices
  • 12.5.2 Feed Storage and Processing
  • 12.5.3 Decontamination
  • 12.5.3.1 Physical Methods
  • 12.5.3.2 Chemical Methods
  • 12.5.4 Mycotoxin-Detoxified Agents
  • 12.5.4.1 Binders
  • 12.5.4.2 Biotransforming Agents
  • 12.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 13 Foodborne Disease Outbreaks in Complex Manufacturing Establishments - Louise Manning, Carol A. Wallace, and Jan Mei Soon
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Review of Manufacturing Outbreaks
  • 13.2.1 Typhoid Outbreak in Aberdeen, United Kingdom (1964)
  • 13.2.2 Foodborne Botulism Outbreak Associated with Hazelnut Yoghurt, United Kingdom (1989)
  • 13.2.3 Salmonella Typhimurium Foodborne Illness Outbreak Associated with Peanut Products
  • 13.2.3.1 Timeline of Events (Goetz, 2013)
  • 13.2.3.2 Critical Evaluation of the Event
  • 13.2.4 Listeria monocytogenes in Maple Leaf Foods Products
  • 13.2.4.1 Timeline of Events
  • 13.2.4.2 Critical Evaluation of the Outbreak
  • 13.3 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 14 Outbreaks of Foodborne Disease in the Foodservice Industry - Ewen C.D. Todd
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Outbreak No. 1: Restaurant Salmonella Enteritidis Outbreak Associated with an Asymptomatic Infected Food Worker
  • 14.3 Outbreak No. 2: Epidemiology of an Unusually Prolonged Outbreak of Typhoid Fever in Terrassa, Spain
  • 14.4 Outbreak No. 3: Outbreak of Staphylococcal Food Poisoning due to SEA-Producing Staphylococcus aureus
  • 14.5 Outbreak No. 4: Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Associated with a Foodborne Outbreak of Gastroenteritis
  • 14.6 Outbreak No. 5: Norovirus Outbreaks in Michigan, 2005 and 2006
  • 14.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 15 Food Fraud with Melamine and Global Implications: Was Africa Left Defenseless to the Chinese Melamine Scandal? … - Dagmar Schoder
  • 15.1 Introduction and Background
  • 15.2 Study Aim
  • 15.3 Significance of the Case
  • 15.4 Methods
  • 15.4.1 Laboratory Investigation
  • 15.4.2 Test Kit: Sample Preparation
  • 15.4.3 ELISA Assay
  • 15.4.4 Location
  • 15.4.5 Tanzanian Milk Powder Supply and Marketing Systems
  • 15.4.6 Sample Categories and Supply of the East African Market
  • 15.5 Results
  • 15.5.1 Branded Products
  • 15.5.2 Illegally Sold Products
  • 15.5.3 Melamine Assay
  • 15.5.4 Melamine Concentrations
  • 15.5.5 Traceability Investigation
  • 15.6 Discussion
  • 15.6.1 Melamine Significance
  • 15.6.2 What Are the Implications for African Infants?
  • 15.6.3 Melamine Background Exposure
  • 15.6.4 For How Long Had Adulteration Been Going On?
  • 15.6.5 Lessons Learnt
  • 15.6.6 Is There an End to Melamine Contamination in Sight?
  • 15.6.7 Could the Melamine Scandal Have Been Prevented?
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 16 Manufacturing Food Safety Incidents and the Role of Food Safety Culture - Michael S. Wright
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Incidents Associated with Organizational Attitudes and Behaviors
  • 16.3 Attitudes, Perceptions, and Behavioral Factors
  • 16.4 Elements of an Effective Organizational Food Safety Culture
  • 16.5 Tracing Cultural Factors in Incidents: Root Cause Analysis
  • 16.6 Improving Food Safety Organizational Culture
  • 16.6.1 Assessing Safety Culture
  • 16.7 Diagnosing Food Safety Culture
  • 16.8 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 17 Risk Communication during Foodborne Disease Outbreaks: The Four Rs - Douglas Powell and Benjamin Chapman
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 The Four Rs of Risk Communication
  • 17.2.1 Rapid
  • 17.2.2 Relevant
  • 17.2.3 Reliable
  • 17.2.4 Review and Revise
  • 17.3 A Case Study: Food Safety Infosheets
  • 17.3.1 Applying the Four Rs
  • 17.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 18 Foodborne Disease Outbreaks: Lessons Learned - Carol A. Wallace, Louise Manning, and Jan Mei Soon