Disease Surveillance: Technological Contributions to Global Health Security

Editor/Author Blazes, David L. and Lewis, Sheri H.
Publication Year: 2016
Publisher: CRC Press

Single-User Purchase Price: $89.95
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: Not Available
ISBN: 978-1-48-225439-6
Category: Health & Medicine - Health
Image Count: 32
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

Disease Surveillance: Technological Contributions to Global Health Security reminds us of the continued vulnerability of the world to contagious infections. The bookpresents examples of disease surveillance systems and evaluates promising advances as well as opportunities for new systems.It also explains how newer technologies can allow countries to comply with the International Health Regulations established by the World Health Organization.

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Table of Contents

  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Contributors
  • PART 1 DISEASE SURVEILLANCE CONCEPTS
  • 1 Introduction to electronic disease surveillance - David L. Blazes and Sheri H. Lewis
  • Introduction
  • Modern historical perspective
  • Organization of the text
  • Controversial points
  • The future
  • References
  • 2 International health regulations: Policy - Rebecca Katz, Sarah Kornblet, Erin M. Sorrell, Claire Standley, and Julie Fischer
  • Background
  • IHR article by article
  • Annex 1: Part A. Core capacity requirements for surveillance and response
  • Annex 1: Part B. Core capacity requirements for designated airports, ports, and ground crossings
  • Annex 2: Decision instrument for the assessment and notification of events that may constitute a PHEIC
  • Other guidance
  • Issues not covered by IHR
  • IHR in use: Declared PHEICs
  • H1N1 influenza pandemic of 2009
  • Polio–The second declared PHEIC
  • Ebola–The third declared PHEIC
  • Anticipating new challenges: The current status of MERS-CoV surveillance
  • Timeline and current status
  • References
  • 3 Public health surveillance system considerations - Carmen C. Mundaca-Shah, John Mark Velasco, and Julie A. Pavlin
  • Introduction
  • Use of electronic automated surveillance tools
  • Considerations for developing settings
  • Building sustainable disease surveillance systems in resource-limited settings
  • The planning phase
  • Strategic vision and plan
  • Legislative action
  • Financial support
  • Technical support
  • Coordination
  • Building surveillance teams
  • Setting up national and local teams
  • Training
  • Monitoring and evaluation
  • Feedback
  • Supervision
  • Support
  • Generating timely and quality data at the Surveillance site
  • Surveillance awareness
  • Incentives
  • Accountability
  • Feasibility
  • Summary
  • Disclaimer
  • References
  • 4 Surveillance challenges in resource-limited settings - Karen Saylors
  • Background
  • The need for standardized clinical case definitions
  • Limited lab capacity in low-resource areas
  • Ongoing infectious disease monitoring
  • Information technology challenges
  • Piloting an open-source electronic surveillance system in Cameroon
  • A framework for a successful information technology approach
  • Sustainability
  • Sentinel surveillance systems
  • Zoonotic disease monitoring
  • Socio-cultural challenges of disease surveillance
  • HIV point prevalence studies across Central Africa
  • Public health implications of surveillance in under-resourced settings
  • Challenges with real-time epidemiological analysis and feedback
  • The challenge of engaging stakeholders
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • 5 The role and functional components of statistical alerting methods for biosurveillance - Howard S. Burkom
  • Analysis context
  • Data aggregation and filtering
  • Effect of spatial data aggregation
  • Effect of temporal aggregation
  • General aggregation considerations
  • Statistical alerting methods by objective
  • Primary objectives
  • Case-based Alerting
  • Scenario-based Alerting
  • General aberration detection
  • Components of aberration detection methods63 Preconditioning tactics
  • Background estimation step
  • Test statistic formation
  • Threshold determination
  • Component summary
  • Determining significant clusters in space and time
  • References
  • 6 Effective public health data visualization - Neil F. Abernethy and Lauren N. Carroll
  • Introduction
  • Background
  • Surveying approaches to visualization in public health
  • Information needs and learning behavior
  • Architecture of existing tools
  • User preferences
  • Features of existing tools
  • GIS
  • Molecular epidemiology
  • Social network analysis
  • Usability
  • Implementation and adoption
  • Conclusion
  • Future directions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • PART 2 DISEASE Surveillance Practice
  • 7 The international health regulations in practice: Surveillance and a globalcommunity seeking health security - David Brett-Major and Dennis Faix
  • The regulations
  • Surveillance systems that cross borders
  • Challenges and a way ahead
  • Conflict of interest
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 8 Possible solutions for sustainable surveillance systems - Christopher L. Perdue
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • 9 mHealth and its role in disease surveillance - Lavanya Vasudevan, Soma Ghoshal, and Alain B. Labrique
  • Challenges in extant disease surveillance systems
  • Timeliness of data
  • Quality and interoperability of data
  • Data integration
  • Geolocating data
  • mHealth for disease surveillance
  • Electronic data collection platforms
  • Internet or citizen-sourced disease surveillance data
  • Animal disease surveillance systems
  • Future of mHealth in disease surveillance
  • References
  • 10 Global health and open source software (OSS): An example of legal considerations impacting technology and global health policy implementation - Erin N. Hahn
  • Introduction
  • The framework of global health law
  • Overview
  • IHR
  • Understanding open source
  • Background on copyright
  • Free versus open software
  • Overview of commonly used licenses
  • Academic or nonprotective licenses
  • Reciprocal or protective licenses
  • Common misconceptions about open source licenses
  • Enforceability
  • Benefits and limitations of open source software
  • Government use of open source software
  • Open source software, an mHealth/eHealth perspective
  • Open source software and IHR implementation
  • Challenges
  • Acronyms
  • References
  • 11 Role of mass gathering surveillance - Shraddha Patel
  • The 2012 Republican National Convention
  • National special security events: Enhanced disease surveillance in the District of Columbia
  • 2014 Micronesian Games
  • Going for gold: Syndromic surveillance preparations for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games
  • Participatory surveillance for mass gatherings
  • References
  • 12 Promising advances in surveillance technology for global health security - Sheri H. Lewis, Howard S. Burkom, Steve Babin, and David L. Blazes
  • Information and communications technology
  • Workforce
  • Cloud computing
  • The quantified life
  • Internet of things
  • Promising advances in predictive analytics
  • Fusion analytics
  • Challenges
  • Approaches
  • Biosurveillance
  • Conclusions
  • References