The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Ancient Israel

Editor/Author Niditch, Susan
Publication Year: 2016
Publisher: Wiley

Single-User Purchase Price: $195.00
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: $292.50
ISBN: 978-0-47-065677-8
Category: Religion & Theology
Image Count: 16
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

The Companion to Ancient Israel offers an unparalleled exploration of the political, social and cultural world of ancient Israel. Methodologically sophisticated, it provides an overview of ancient Israelite culture, richly informed by a variety of approaches and fields. These include the history of religion with its interests in worldviews, symbol systems, paradigms, and the benefits of comparative, cross-cultural study; the study of religion as lived, an approach that examines the everyday lives of ordinary people and the material cultures that they construct and experience; and cultural studies with its interdisciplinary emphases and methodological questions about the academic assumptions that scholars make.

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Table of Contents

  • List of Tables
  • List of Illustrations
  • Notes on Contributors
  • Acknowledgments
  • Editor's Introduction
  • Part I: Methodology: Questions, Concepts, Approaches, and Tools
  • A: Contextualizing Israelite Culture
  • Chapter 1 Archaeology: What It Can Teach Us
  • Introduction to Archaeological Methods of Excavation and Interpretation
  • “Biblical Israel” of the Text and “Ancient Israel” of the Archaeological Remains
  • Reconstructing Ancient and Biblical Israel from an Archaeological Perspective
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 2 Israel in Its Neighboring Context
  • Amorites and the Canaanites
  • Philistines
  • Moabites and Ammonites
  • Edomites
  • Midianites
  • Arameans
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 3 Ancient Egypt and Israel: History, Culture, and the Biblical Text
  • Historical and Cultural Interaction
  • The Comparative Enterprise
  • Concluding Comments
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 4 Text and Context in Biblical Studies: A Brief History of a Troubled Relationship
  • The Bible Displaced
  • New Historicism to the Rescue?
  • Down Memory Lane
  • Bibliography
  • B: Hebrew Bible and Tracking Israelite History and Culture
  • Chapter 5 Folklore and Israelite Tradition: Appreciation and Application
  • The Essence of Folklore
  • Resistance to Folklore and Misunderstanding
  • Applications
  • Findings
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 6 The Formation of the Hebrew Bible: Sources, Compositional Layers, and Other Revisions
  • Forms of Ancient Revision of Texts
  • Examples of Scribal Revision in Genesis 1–11
  • Study of the Formation of the Pentateuch
  • The Formation of Other Parts of the Hebrew Bible
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 7 Linguistics and the Dating of Biblical Literature
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 8 Epigraphy: Writing Culture in the Iron Age Levant
  • Laying the Groundwork
  • The Focus: Iron Age Inscriptions in the Levant
  • Of Kings and Kingdoms: Monumental Inscriptions of the Iron Age
  • Monumental Inscriptions about Military Conquests: Tel Dan (Old Aramaic) and Mesha (Moabite)
  • Treaty Texts: Sefire (Old Aramaic)
  • The King's Public Works and Pious Deeds
  • The Tell Miqne (Ekron) Temple Inscription (Phoenician of Philistia)
  • The Public Works of King Mesha (Moabite)
  • The Public Works of King Amminadab: The Tell Siran Bronze Bottle (Ammonite)
  • The Siloam Tunnel Inscription of King Hezekiah of Judah (Old Hebrew) as a Public Work
  • King Hadd-Yithi of Gozan: The Tell Fakhariyeh Inscription (Old Aramaic) and Public Works
  • Royal Burial Inscriptions: The Ahiram Sarcophagus (Phoenician) and the Royal Steward (Old Hebrew)
  • Inscribed Cultic Objects and Inscribed Prestige Objects: Inscriptions from Mudeyineh (Moabite) and Kefar Veradim (Phoenician)
  • On the Bureaucracy of Kingdoms: The Samaria Ostraca and the Gibeon Jar Handles (Old Hebrew)
  • Old Hebrew Epistolary Texts
  • The Ubiquity of Religion in Ancient Writing Culture
  • Bibliography
  • Part II: Political History
  • A: Origins
  • Chapter 9 The Emergence of Israel and Theories of Ethnogenesis
  • Identity and Origins: A Cautionary Note
  • Past Research on the Emergence of Israel: A Brief Summary
  • Archaeology and Ethnicity: Background
  • Identifying Ethnicity in the Archaeological Record: Some Preliminary Observations
  • The Emergence of Israel in the Iron Age
  • The Historical Context for the Emergence of Israelite Traits: Israel and the Philistines
  • Merenptah's Israel
  • Israel's Ethnogenesis: A Chronological Summary
  • Bibliography
  • B: Monarchic Period
  • Chapter 10 The Early Monarchy and the Stories of Saul, David, and Solomon
  • The Biblical Texts and the Political History of the Israelite Early Monarchy: Changing Assessments and Current Approaches
  • Historical Reconstructions through the 1980s
  • Challenges and Reassessments
  • Current Interpretations
  • The Early Monarchy as Israelite State Formation
  • Other Reading Frames for the Stories of the Early Monarchy
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 11 The Divided Monarchy
  • Sources
  • The Regnal Formulae
  • Preexisting Prophetic Stories
  • The Split and Its Aftermath (922–875 BCE)
  • Peace and Political Expansion (875–842 BCE)
  • Nationalistic Religious Retrenchment and Political Weakness (842–800 BCE)
  • Limited Recovery (800–775 BCE)
  • Renewed Expansion (775–750 (738) BCE)
  • Reaction to Assyria and the Fall of the North (735–715 BCE)
  • Hezekiah's Revival (715–686 BCE)
  • Vassaldom (686–640 BCE)
  • Josiah's Revival (640–609 BCE)
  • Collapse (609–586 BCE)
  • Bibliography
  • C: Postmonarchic Period: In the Land and Diaspora
  • Chapter 12 (Re)Defining “Israel”: The Legacy of the Neo-Babylonian and Persian Periods
  • The Problem of the Exile
  • Textual and Archaeological Strata(gies)
  • Mizpah, Jerusalem and Ramat Raḥel: A Tale of Three Cities
  • Textual and Religious Constructs
  • Retrospect and Prospects
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 13 The Hellenistic Period
  • Hellenism and the Hellenistic Age: Demarcations and Definitions
  • Hellenistic Kingdoms and Hellenism in the Land of Israel and the Jewish Diaspora
  • Political and Social Contexts: Economic Inequity and Native Revolts
  • The Maccabean Crisis
  • Jewish Apocalypticism in Its Hellenistic Setting
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Part III: Themes in Israelite Culture
  • A: God and Gods
  • Chapter 14 The Gods of Israel in Comparative Ancient Near Eastern Context
  • “Who Is Like Yahweh?”
  • The Canaanite Pantheon
  • Literary Portrayals of Yahweh
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 15 Monotheism and the Redefinition of Divinity in Ancient Israel
  • Monotheism's Modern Discontents
  • The Context for Monotheistic Discourse in the Seventh–Sixth Centuries
  • Monotheism and the Redefinition of Divinity
  • Bibliography
  • B: Mediation: Gods and Humans
  • Chapter 16 Priests and Ritual
  • The Priestly Theology of the Tetrateuch
  • Sinai Revelation of the Covenant
  • The Sacrificial Cult
  • Priesthood in the Tetrateuch
  • Historical Reconstruction: Cult and Priesthood in Israelite and Judean Religions
  • The Priesthood
  • Closing Thoughts
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 17 Prophecy
  • The Perception of Divine Revelation
  • The Packaging of the Revelation
  • The Evaluation of Genuineness
  • Preservation of True Prophecies
  • Later Interpretations of Written Prophecies
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 18 Apocalypticism
  • Identification of a Genre
  • Apocalypticism in the Prophets?
  • Definition of “Apocalypse”
  • Persian Period Prophecy
  • The Hope for Resurrection
  • A Hellenistic Phenomenon
  • Bibliography
  • C: Social Interaction
  • Chapter 19 Religion at Home: The Materiality of Practice
  • Making a Household a Home
  • Setting a Meal
  • Locating the Dead
  • Ritualizing the Body
  • Summary
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 20 Education and the Transmission of Tradition
  • Education in the Family Household
  • Literacy in Ancient Israel
  • Texts as Mnemonic Aids
  • Scribal Guilds as Vehicles of Education and Transmission
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 21 Kinship, Community, and Society
  • Methodological Issues and Terminology
  • Kinship When There Was No King: The Social Structure of Early Israel (1200–1000 BCE)
  • The Social History of Iron Age II: A Changing Landscape
  • The Beginnings of Diaspora: Judeans in Babylon and Egypt in the Sixth–Fifth Centuries BCE
  • Judah in the Persian Era: Social Disruption and the Fraying of Community Ties
  • Hellenistic Judea: Urbanization and Sectarianism
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 22 Law and Legal Literature
  • Biblical Sources of Law
  • Forms of Law
  • Areas of Law
  • Legal Institutions
  • The Ideologies and Historical Contexts of the Law Collections
  • The Literary Frame of Biblical Law
  • Legal Revision as a Means of Cultural Renewal
  • The Decalogue
  • Deuteronomy's Draft Constitution: The Origins of Rule of Law and Separation of Powers
  • Conclusions: The Legacy of Biblical Law for the Modern World
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 23 Women's Lives
  • Sources
  • Economic Activities: Women at Work
  • Reproductive Activities: Women and Children
  • Social and Political Activities: Women and Their Communities
  • Women's Religious Activities: Regular and Occasional
  • Outside the Household: Women's Community Roles
  • Conclusions
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 24 Economy and Society in Iron Age Israel and Judah: An Archaeological Perspective
  • Archaeological Chronology and Political Context
  • Sources of Evidence and Conceptual Frameworks
  • Households, Villages, Walled Towns and “Urbanism”
  • Bibliography
  • D: Artistic Expression
  • Chapter 25 Verbal Art and Literary Sensibilities in Ancient Near Eastern Context
  • Extrinsic Considerations of Literariness: Marking the Literary Text
  • Intrinsic Considerations of Literariness: Repetition
  • Extending the Line: Incremental Development
  • The Power of the Word and the Significance of the Pun
  • Literary Art in Writing
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 26 The Flowering of Literature in the Persian Period: The Writings/Ketuvim
  • The Ketuvim in the Persian Period
  • The Narratives in the Writings/Ketuvim as Responses to Crisis
  • Poetic and Proverbial Literature
  • Conclusions
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 27 Hellenistic Period Literature in the Land of Israel
  • Category 1: The Use of Older Literature as a Framing Device or Springboard
  • Category 2: Implicit Use of or Allusion to Earlier Texts
  • Category 3: Explicit Citation and Use of Scriptural Antecedents
  • Category 4: Revision and Rewriting of Earlier Texts
  • Category 5: Texts That Relate to Earlier Texts but That Complicate the Previous Categories
  • Bibliography
  • Chapter 28 Art and Iconography: Representing Yahwistic Divinity
  • A Concentration on the Anthropomorphic
  • Symbols: Beyond the Anthropomorphic
  • From Sacred Stone to Sacred Emptiness
  • Resetting our Iconoclastic Clock: Sacred Emptiness
  • Theoretical Framework
  • Divine Fire
  • The Impossibility of Crafting the Essence of Fire
  • The Use of “Radiance” to Depict the Presence of Yahweh
  • Solar Divinity
  • Deuteronomistic Name Theology
  • Sacred Emptiness
  • Invisibility
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography