The Molecular Life of Plants

Editor/Author Jones, Russell, Ougham, Helen and Thomas, Howard, et.al.
Publication Year: 2012
Publisher: Wiley

Single-User Purchase Price: $191.95
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: $287.92
ISBN: 978-0-47-087011-2
Category: Science - Botany
Image Count: 743
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

The Molecular Life of Plants presents students with an innovative, integrated approach to plant science. It looks at the processes and mechanisms that underlie each stage of plant life and describes the intricate network of cellular, molecular, biochemical and physiological events through which plants make life on land possible. The book follows the life of the plant, starting with the seed, progressing through germination to the seedling and mature plant, and ending with reproduction and senescence.

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Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Part I Origins
  • 1 Plant life: a primer
  • 1.1 An introduction to plant biology
  • 1.2 Plant systematics
  • 1.3 The origin of land plants
  • 1.4 Bryophytes
  • 1.5 Vascular plants
  • 1.6 Gymnosperm phylogeny and reproduction
  • 1.7 Angiosperm phylogeny and reproduction
  • 1.8 The seed plant body plan I. Epidermis, ground tissue and vascular system
  • 1.9 The seed plant body plan II. Form and function of organ systems
  • 1.10 The seed plant body plan III. Growth and development of new organs
  • 2 Molecules, metabolism and energy
  • 2.1 Introduction to biological chemistry and energetics
  • 2.2 Biological molecules
  • 2.3 Energy
  • 2.4 Enzymes
  • 3 Genome organization and expression
  • 3.1 Introduction to genes and genomes
  • 3.2 Organization of plant genomes I. Plastid, mitochondrial and nuclear genomes
  • 3.3 Organization of plant genomes II. Chromosomes and chromatin
  • 3.4 Expression of the plant genome I. Transcription of DNA to RNA
  • 3.5 Expression of the plant genome II. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression
  • 3.6 Expression of the plant genome III. Translation of RNA to protein
  • 3.7 Expression of organellar genes
  • 4 Cell architecture
  • 4.1 Introduction to cell structure
  • 4.2 The cell wall
  • 4.3 Membranes of the cell
  • 4.4 The nucleus
  • 4.5 The endomembrane system
  • 4.6 Plastids
  • 4.7 Mitochondria and peroxisomes
  • 4.8 The cytoskeleton
  • Part II Germination
  • 5 Membrane transport and intracellular protein trafficking
  • 5.1 Introduction to the movement of solutes and macromolecules
  • 5.2 Physical principles
  • 5.3 Regulation of solute movement by membranes and their associated transporters
  • 5.4 Pumps
  • 5.5 Channels
  • 5.6 Carriers and co-transporters, mediators of diffusion and secondary active transport
  • 5.7 Intracellular transport of proteins
  • 5.8 The protein secretory pathway
  • 5.9 Protein turnover and the role of the ubiquitin–proteasome system
  • 6 Seed to seedling: germination and mobilization of food reserves
  • 6.1 Introduction to seeds and their germination
  • 6.2 Seed structure
  • 6.3 Use of seed storage reserves by the germinating embryo
  • 6.4 Germination and early seedling growth
  • 6.5 Mobilization of stored reserves to support seedling growth
  • 7 Metabolism of reserves: respiration and gluconeogenesis
  • 7.1 Introduction to catabolism and anabolism
  • 7.2 Anaerobic phase of carbohydrate breakdown
  • 7.3 The tricarboxylic acid cycle
  • 7.4 Mitochondrial electron transport and ATP synthesis
  • 7.5 The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway
  • 7.6 Lipid breakdown linked to carbohydrate biosynthesis
  • 7.7 Control and integration of respiratory carbon metabolism
  • Part III Emergence
  • 8 Light perception and transduction
  • 8.1 Introduction to light and life
  • 8.2 Phytochrome
  • 8.3 Physiological responses to blue and ultraviolet light
  • 8.4 Biosynthesis of chlorophyll and other tetrapyrroles
  • 8.5 Circadian and photoperiodic control
  • 9 Photosynthesis and photorespiration
  • 9.1 Introduction to photosynthesis
  • 9.2 Pigments and photosystems
  • 9.3 Photosystem II and the oxygen-evolving complex
  • 9.4 Electron transport through the cytochrome b6f complex
  • 9.5 Photosystem I and the formation of NADPH
  • 9.6 Photophosphorylation
  • 9.7 Carbon dioxide fixation and the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle
  • 9.8 Photorespiration
  • 9.9 Variations in mechanisms of primary carbon dioxide fixation
  • Part IV Growth
  • 10 Hormones and other signals
  • 10.1 Introduction to plant hormones
  • 10.2 Auxins
  • 10.3 Gibberellins
  • 10.4 Cytokinins
  • 10.5 Ethylene
  • 10.6 Brassinosteroids
  • 10.7 Abscisic acid
  • 10.8 Strigolactones
  • 10.9 Jasmonates
  • 10.10 Polyamines
  • 10.11 Salicylic acid
  • 10.12 Nitric oxide
  • 11 The cell cycle and meristems
  • 11.1 Introduction to cell division and meristems
  • 11.2 Molecular components of the cell cycle: kinases, cyclins, phosphatases and inhibitors
  • 11.3 Control of progress through the cell cycle
  • 11.4 Cell cycle control during development
  • 11.5 The meiotic cell cycle
  • 12 Growth and development
  • 12.1 Introduction to plant development
  • 12.2 Cell origins and growth
  • 12.3 Embryogenesis
  • 12.4 Growth and differentiation of roots
  • 12.5 Growth and differentiation of leaves
  • 12.6 Shoot architecture and stature
  • Part V Maturation
  • 13 Mineral nutrient acquisition and assimilation
  • 13.1 Introduction to plant nutrition
  • 13.2 Nitrogen
  • 13.3 Phosphorus
  • 13.4 Sulfur
  • 13.5 Cationic macronutrients: potassium, calcium and magnesium
  • 13.6 Micronutrients
  • 14 Intercellular and long-distance transport
  • 14.1 Introduction to transport of water and solutes
  • 14.2 The concept of water potential
  • 14.3 Water uptake by plant cells
  • 14.4 The role of plasmodesmata in solute and water transport
  • 14.5 Translocation of photosynthate in the phloem
  • 14.6 Phloem loading, translocation and unloading
  • 14.7 Water movement in the xylem
  • 14.8 The path of water from soil to atmosphere
  • 15 Environmental interactions
  • 15.1 Introduction to plant–environment interactions
  • 15.2 General principles of plant–environment interactions
  • 15.3 Metabolic responses to stress I. Phenolics
  • 15.4 Metabolic responses to stress II. Alkaloids
  • 15.5 Metabolic responses to stress III. Terpenoids
  • 15.6 Responses to abiotic stresses
  • 15.7 Responses to biotic stresses
  • Part VI Renewal
  • 16 Flowering and sexual reproduction
  • 16.1 Introduction to flowering
  • 16.2 Induction of flowering
  • 16.3 Development of floral organs
  • 16.4 Development of the male and female gametophytes
  • 16.5 Pollination and fertilization
  • 16.6 Seed and fruit development
  • 17 Development and dormancy of resting structures
  • 17.1 Introduction to resting structures in the plant life cycle
  • 17.2 Forms and functions of resting organs
  • 17.3 Synthesis and deposition of reserves
  • 17.4 Dormancy
  • 17.5 Regulation of development and dormancy of resting organs
  • 17.6 Adaptive and evolutionary significance of the resting phase
  • 18 Senescence, ripening and cell death
  • 18.1 Introduction to terminal events in the life of a plant and its parts
  • 18.2 Cell death during growth and morphogenesis
  • 18.3 Leaf senescence
  • 18.4 Programmed senescence and death in the development of reproductive structures and seeds
  • 18.5 Fruit ripening
  • 18.6 Environmental influences on programmed senescence and death
  • Acknowledgments, credits and sources