Contemporary World Issues: School Violence: A Reference Handbook

Editor/Author Finley, Laura L.
Publication Year: 2014
Publisher: ABC-CLIO

Single-User Purchase Price: $58.00
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: $87.00
ISBN: 978-1-61-069623-4
Category: Social Sciences - Contemporary Issues & Controversies
Image Count: 17
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

This comprehensive text introduces the history of school violence in the United States, providing an overview of proposed causes-from violent video games, to inadequate parental involvement, to bullying by classmates-and detailing the pros and cons of various deterrents.

Share this

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1 Background and History
  • Types of School Violence
  • Measuring School Violence
  • Brief History of School Violence Incidents
  • Legislation and Court Decisions
  • Supreme Court Cases
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • 2 Problems, Controversies, and Solutions
  • Effects of School Violence
  • Biological Theories
  • Psychological Theories
  • Rational Choice Theory
  • Social Strain Theories
  • Social Learning Theories
  • Social Control Theories
  • Labeling Theories
  • Conflict Theories
  • Integrated Theories
  • Feminist Theories
  • Risk Factors
  • Individual
  • Family
  • School
  • Community
  • Protective Factors
  • Individual
  • Family
  • School
  • Community
  • Interventions
  • Anonymous Tip Lines
  • Profiling
  • Dress Codes and Uniforms
  • Metal Detectors
  • Video Cameras
  • Conflict Resolution and Peer Mediation
  • Peaceable Schools
  • Restorative Justice
  • School Police Officers
  • Canine Searches
  • Zero Tolerance Laws
  • Other Laws
  • Conclusion
  • Further Reading
  • 3 Perspectives
  • A Student's Perspective on the Dangers of Bullying: Lashanti Jupp
  • Reflections on Mean Girls: Lauren Lorance
  • Sticks and Stones Can Break My Bones, but Names Will Never Hurt Me? Approaches to Language Mis(uses) in Schooling: Kelly Concannon
  • The People's Court in a South Bronx Elementary School: Evelyn Jackson
  • Creating and Sustaining Positive School Climates: DePalazzo
  • Being Out
  • Confidentiality and LGBT Students: It's the Law
  • Our Gender-Nonconforming Youth and Transgender Youth
  • Creating a Safe Space for All: Policies, Programs, and Practices
  • Federal Law
  • State Law
  • Local Policies and Acts
  • Other Key Ways to Show Allyship to LGBTQ Youth
  • Resources
  • Is There More School Violence Today? A Veteran Educator Says No: Sarah Raitter
  • Reflections on PeaceJam and School Violence in the United Kingdom: Larenda Twigg
  • Preventing School Violence: Barbara J. Wien
  • Violence as a Continuum
  • Shifting U.S. Culture
  • Ending War and Violence
  • Cultivating Caring Communities
  • How to Build Community
  • Best Practices in Reducing School Violence
  • Working for a Higher Purpose
  • The Circle Model
  • Organizing for Peace in Your Community: Six Steps for Success
  • References
  • Activism against Domestic and Dating Violence: Stephanie Wong
  • Turning the Personal into Progress: Robert Spencer Knotts
  • 4 Profiles
  • Bath, Michigan, School Bombing
  • Columbine Massacre
  • Laurie Dann
  • Kip Kinkel
  • Adam Lanza
  • Barry Loukaitis
  • Patrick Purdy
  • Evan Ramsey
  • Charles Carl Roberts IV
  • Steubenville High School Rape Case
  • Jeff Weiss
  • Phoebe Prince, Bullycide
  • Amanda Todd, Bullycide
  • Break the Cycle
  • Geoffrey Canada
  • Riane Eisler, JD
  • Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN)
  • Jackson Katz
  • Paul Kivel
  • Hank Nuwer
  • StopBullying.gov
  • Students Against Violence Everywhere (SAVE)
  • Further Reading
  • 5 Data and Documents
  • Data
  • Figure 5.1 Trends in school-associated violent deaths, 1992–2010
  • Figure 5.2 Percentage of students in grades 9–12 who reported being threatened or injured with a weapon on school property at least one time during the previous 12 months, by grade: Various years, 1993–2009
  • Figure 5.3 Percentage of public and private school teachers who reported that they were threatened with injury or that they were physically attacked by a student from school during the previous 12 months, by locale and instructional level: School year 2007–2008
  • Figure 5.4 Percentage of students ages 12–18 who reported criminal victimization at school during the previous six months, by type of victimization: Various years, 1995–2009
  • Figure 5.5 Percentage of students ages 12–18 who reported that gangs were present at school during the school year, by urbanicity: 2007 and 2009
  • Figure 5.6 Percentage of students ages 12–18 who reported being targets of hate-related words and seeing hate-related graffiti at school during the school year, by selected student and school characteristics: 2009
  • Figure 5.7 Percentage of students ages 12–18 who reported being bullied at school during the school year, by selected bullying problems and sex: 2009
  • Figure 5.8 Percentage of students ages 12–18 who reported cyberbullying problems anywhere during the school year, by selected bullying problems and sex: 2009
  • Figure 5.9 Percentage of students ages 12–18 who reported avoiding school activities or one or more places in school because of fear of attack or harm during the school year: 2009
  • Figure 5.10 Percentage of students ages 12–18 who reported selected security measures at school: Various years, 1999–2009
  • Sandy Hook Elementary School Violence Reduction Act
  • Safe Schools Improvement Act of 2013
  • Barack Obama's Statement on the School Shooting in Newtown, Connecticut
  • The Myths about Bullying: Secretary Arne Duncan's Remarks at the Bullying Prevention Summit
  • 6 Resources for Further Research
  • Books School Violence
  • Bullying
  • Specific Cases
  • Hazing
  • Civil Liberties
  • Gender
  • Dating and Sexual Violence
  • Suicide, Eating Disorders, and Self-Harm
  • Theories and Explanations
  • Responses
  • Media
  • Recommended Journals
  • Journal Articles, 2010–Present
  • Websites and Organizations
  • Films
  • 7 Chronology
  • Glossary
  • About the Author