Research Methods for Social Psychology

Editor/Author Dunn, Dana S.
Publication Year: 2013
Publisher: Wiley

Single-User Purchase Price: $109.95
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: $164.93
ISBN: 978-1-11-840605-2
Category: Psychology
Image Count: 38
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

The 2nd edition of Research Methods for Social Psychology offers information on how to conduct empirical research in social psychology. The author teaches readers to think like experimental social psychologists, that is, to use or develop explanatory theories and to manipulate and measure variables in order to explain the origin or purpose of some aspect of social life.

Share this

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Acknowledgments
  • About the Author
  • 1 Studying Social Psychology
  • Introducing and Defining Social Psychology
  • Establishing Causality: The Importance of Experimentation in Social Psychology
  • Levels of Explanation: Social Psychology's Relation to Other Fields of Inquiry
  • Personality Psychology's Relation to Social Psychology
  • The Scientific Method: Doing Social Psychology
  • Why? Social Psychology is Social
  • Social Thought
  • Social Influence
  • Social Connections
  • Where? The Lab and the Field
  • The Lab
  • The Field
  • One More Distinction: Basic and Applied Research
  • Social Psychologists Today
  • Active Learning Exercise 1A: Learning About Active Social Psychologists
  • Learning Research Methods for Social Psychology
  • Active Learning Exercise 1B: Planning a Research Project in Social Psychology
  • Exercises
  • 2 Developing Research Topics in Social Psychology
  • The Scope of Social Psychology
  • Traditional Topics and New Avenues for Research
  • Extending Earlier Research
  • Finding a Research Question
  • Self-Reflection
  • Explore but Verify Hindsight
  • Your Campus
  • Your Community
  • Look to the Media
  • The Wider World
  • Ask an Expert
  • The World Wide Web
  • Watch Other People
  • Other Sources for Research Ideas
  • Active Learning Exercise 2A: Developing Topic Ideas by Brainstorming
  • Active Learning Exercise 2B: Keeping a Social Psychology Log
  • Searching the Social Psychological Literature
  • Searching Databases
  • Searching the Library Catalog
  • Seeking Help: Speak to Reference Professionals
  • Active Learning Exercise 2C: Maintaining a Bibliography and Organizing Sources
  • Reading Social Psychology Research
  • Borrowing Ideas from Published Social Psychology Experiments
  • Exercises
  • 3 Ethical Issues in Social Psychological Research
  • Milgram's Obedience Research
  • Other Ethically Challenging Examples
  • The Problem of Deception in Social Psychology Experiments: Balancing Benefitsand Costs
  • Arguments for Using Deception: Some Benefits
  • Arguments Against Using Deception: The Costs
  • The Special Role of Confederates
  • Labels Do Matter: Participants, Not Subjects
  • Institutional Review Boards
  • Active Learning Exercise 3A: Forming an In-Class IRB
  • Active Learning Exercise 3B: Completing an IRB Form
  • Informed Consent is Essential
  • Confidentiality
  • Obtaining Informed Consent
  • Active Learning Exercise 3C: Creating an Informed Consent Form for Your Project
  • Ethical Issues and Field Research
  • Shared Virtues: Ethical Treatment, Education, and Science
  • A Last Word on Ethics?
  • Exercises
  • 4 Basic Experimental Design
  • The Logic of Experimentation
  • The Advantages of Experiments
  • Why Experiments Matter in Social Psychology
  • Turning a Research Question into a Hypothesis
  • Operational Definitions in Social Psychological Research
  • Active Learning Exercise 4A: Writing an Operational Definition
  • Independent and Dependent Variables
  • Active Learning Exercise 4B: Identifying Independent and Dependent Variables in Social Psychology Experiments
  • Doing Randomization in Social Psychology Experiments
  • Issues of Error
  • Sampling and Randomization
  • Active Learning Exercise 4C: Performing Random Assignment and Random Selection
  • Common Experimental Designs in Social Psychology
  • Between-Subjects Research Designs
  • Within-Subjects Research Designs
  • Active Learning Exercise 4D: Recognizing Main Effects and Interactions
  • Joining Between- and Within-Subject Variables: Mixed Designs
  • Design Matters
  • Exercises
  • Active Learning Exercise 4B Answers
  • Table 4.6 Answers
  • 5 Alternatives to Experimental Research in Social Psychology
  • Leaving the Comfort of the Lab: Problems and Prospects
  • Observational Research
  • Active Learning Exercise 5A: Designing and Conducting an Observational Study
  • Correlational Approaches
  • Active Learning Exercise 5B: Conducting a Correlational Study on Personality
  • Quasi-Experimental Research Designs
  • Nonequivalent Group Designs
  • Time Series Designs
  • Survey Research
  • Approaches to Surveying Opinion
  • Experience Sampling Methods and Diary Approaches
  • Active Learning Exercise 5C: Conducting an ESM Study
  • Dear Diary: An Example
  • Internet-Based Research
  • Internet Ethics
  • Time, Participant Loss, and Sampling Issues
  • An Internet-Based Example: Online Character Pre- and Post-September 11, 2001
  • Archival Research and Meta-Analysis
  • Summarizing Studies of Social Behavior: Meta-Analysis
  • Conclusions
  • Exercises
  • 6 Developing Questionnaires and Surveys
  • Caveat Emptor: Let the (Jam) Buyer Beware
  • The Obvious Advantage of Asking Questions
  • Sampling Issues
  • Probability and Nonprobability Samples
  • Scales of Measurement
  • Nominal Scales
  • Ordinal Scales
  • Interval Scales
  • Ratio Scales
  • Types of Questions: Open-Ended and Close-Ended
  • Open-Ended Questions
  • Close-Ended Questions
  • The Most Common and Useful Numerical Scale: The Likert Scale
  • Writing Clear Questions
  • Phrasing
  • Sequencing Questions
  • Being Sensitive
  • Last Words on Wording for Questionnaires and Surveys
  • Active Learning Exercise 6A: Writing and Revising Questions
  • Active Learning Exercise 6B: Pilot Testing Questions
  • Social Desirability Concerns, Halo Effects, and Yea-Saying
  • We Like to be Liked
  • Likes or Dislikes Can Matter
  • Yes, Yes, A Thousand Times, Yes
  • Anonymity or Identity?
  • A Brief Word on Survey Data Collection
  • Questionnaires and Surveys as Precursors to Experiments
  • Exercises
  • 7 Introducing a Difference: Independent Variables
  • Conceiving Independent Variables
  • Types of Independent Variables
  • Can One Operationalization of an Independent Variable Represent All Possibilities?
  • Providing Context for the Independent Variable: Instructions
  • Plan for Piloting
  • Delivering the Independent Variable
  • Delivery via Authority: The Experimenter
  • Personal Delivery: Confederates and Peers
  • Written Delivery
  • Other Forms of Delivery
  • One More Time: Instruct, Repeat, and Probe
  • Active Learning Exercise 7A: Developing Independent Variables
  • How Many Independent Variables? A Reprise
  • Individual Differences as Independent Variables: Prospects and Problems
  • Verifying Cause and Effect: Manipulation Checks
  • Active Learning Exercise 7B: Developing a Manipulation Check
  • The Best Laid Plans (and Independent Variables)
  • Perform an Internal Analysis
  • Ask Participants But be Wary
  • Impact: Increase Obviousness
  • Reconsider the Hypothesis
  • Keep a Causal Focus
  • Exercises
  • 8 Measuring What Happens: Dependent Variables
  • Behavioral Dependent Measures
  • Measuring What People Do
  • Measuring Intentions and Future Commitments
  • Behavioral Measures in Disguise: Unobtrusive Measures
  • Active Learning Exercise 8A: Creating Creative Dependent Measures
  • Verbal Measures
  • Varieties of Verbal Measures Revisited
  • Some Additional Verbal Dependent Measures
  • Other Types of Dependent Measures
  • Nonverbal Measures
  • Implicit Measures
  • Physiological Measures
  • False Physiological Feedback: The Bogus Pipeline
  • Narrative Approaches
  • Some Practical Issues for Administering Dependent Variables
  • Active Learning Exercise 8B: Developing Dependent Variables by Looking to the Literature
  • Reliability and Dependent Variables
  • Exercises
  • 9 Validity and Realism in Research
  • Trusting Research Evidence: Demonstrating Internal Validity
  • General Threats to Internal Validity
  • Reprise: Ways to Enhance a Study's Internal Validity
  • Generalizing to Other Settings: External Validity
  • External Validity via Replication
  • College Sophomores as Threats to External Validity
  • Context Matters
  • Enhancing External Validity
  • In Praise of External Invalidity
  • The Social Psychologist's Challenge: Trade-Offs Between Internal and External Validity
  • Active Learning Exercise 9A: Evaluating Your Project's Internal and External Validity
  • Making It Real: Mundane, Experimental, and Psychological Realism
  • Active Learning Exercise 9B: Enhancing Mundane and Experimental Realism
  • (Re)Considering Construct Validity
  • Beyond Construct Validity
  • Validity and Realism via Replication
  • Exercises
  • 10 Conducting Social Psychology Experiments: Practical Matters
  • Setting the Stage
  • Deception Revisited: Think Carefully Before You Decide to Deceive Participants
  • Recruiting Participants
  • Active Learning Exercise 10A: Participant Pools, Sign-up Sheets, and Giving Credit
  • Demand Characteristics
  • Reducing Experimenter Biases
  • Active Learning Exercise 10B: Writing a Script for Your Study
  • Record Keeping
  • Active Learning Exercise 10C: Creating a Data Record Sheet
  • Conducting a Postexperimental Interview
  • On The Rare Occasion When Deception Is Necessary
  • Active Learning Exercise 10D: Crafting a Debriefing Protocol
  • Active Learning Exercise 10E: Writing a Debriefing Sheet
  • Closing Thoughts: Pilot Testing and Long-Term Change
  • Exercises
  • 11 Data Analysis
  • Basic Statistics
  • Mean, Mode, and Median
  • Variance and Standard Deviation
  • Correlation: A Reprise
  • Some Brief Comments on Statistical Power and Effect Size—and a Caveat
  • The Role of Data Analysis in Social Psychological Research
  • Plan Analyses In Advance
  • Active Learning Exercise 11A: Planning Data Analyses and Selecting the Proper Statistical Test(s)
  • Interpreting and Reporting Results
  • Stereotype Threat Revisited
  • Active Learning Exercise 11B: Putting Results into Words
  • Learning from Success, Learning from Failure
  • Exercises
  • 12 Presenting Social Psychological Research
  • Persuasive Communication
  • Who
  • What
  • Whom
  • Writing Like a Social Psychologist: A Matter of (APA) Style
  • Sections Found in APA-Style Papers
  • Title
  • Author Note
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Method
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • References
  • Tables and Figures
  • Appendix
  • Additional Formatting Guidelines
  • Active Learning Exercise 12A: Drafting an APA-Style Lab Report of Your Social Psychology Project
  • Seeking Feedback on Your Writing
  • Preparing a Poster Summary
  • Active Learning Exercise 12B: Making a Poster
  • Enter Talking: Preparing and Delivering Oral Research Presentations
  • Preparing a Talk
  • Evaluating a Talk
  • Active Learning Exercise 12C: Giving Social Psychology Away via Audience Handouts
  • Active Learning Exercise 12D: Host a Paper or Poster Session
  • Parting Thoughts
  • Exercises
  • Appendix A Major Journals in Social Psychology
  • Appendix B Reading Journal Articles in Social Psychology
  • Appendix C Student Research Paper
  • References