Fundamentals of Palliative Care for Student Nurses

Editor/Author Rosser, Megan and Walsh, Helen
Publication Year: 2014
Publisher: Wiley

Single-User Purchase Price: $41.99
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: $62.98
ISBN: 978-1-11-843780-3
Category: Health & Medicine - Nursing
Image Count: 48
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

Fundamentals of Palliative Care for Student Nurses is a thorough yet accessible introduction and overview of a key area of the nursing programme. This resource clearly explains the palliation of symptoms and the social context of death and dying. Engaging with the latest guidelines and curriculum, it highlights the practical and communicative skills required for induction programmes and continuing professional development.

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Table of Contents

  • The Authors
  • Megan Rosser RGN, DN cert, BSc (Hons) MSc (London) PG Cert Learning and Teaching
  • Helen C Walsh SRN, RM, RHV, Dip HE Business Administration, MSc, PGCert Education
  • Acknowledgements
  • Preface
  • List of Illustrations
  • List of Tables
  • Section I: The principles of palliative care
  • Chapter 1: The development of palliative care
  • Introduction
  • What is palliative care?
  • Where is palliative care provided?
  • Widening access
  • Palliative care for older people
  • People living with learning disabilities
  • Black and ethnic minorities
  • Influential documents and strategies
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Holistic care in palliative care
  • Introduction
  • Total pain
  • Holism
  • Holistic care
  • Spirituality
  • Quality of life
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Team working
  • Introduction
  • What is a team?
  • Why is interprofessional team work important in palliative care?
  • What makes a team work well?
  • What stops a team from working well?
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Legal principles in palliative care
  • Introduction
  • Identification of legal issues surrounding the provision of palliative care
  • Consent
  • Best interests
  • Withholding and withdrawing treatment
  • Do not resuscitate orders (DNR)
  • Euthanasia and assisted suicide
  • Verification of death
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Ethical principles in palliative care
  • Introduction
  • The meaning of ethics
  • Ethical theories
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Section II: The practice of palliative care
  • Chapter 6: Communication in palliative care
  • Introduction
  • The importance of communication in palliative care
  • Communication theory
  • The importance of self-awareness in good communication
  • Key communication skills
  • Enablers of and barriers to good communication
  • Influencing factors
  • Communicating with groups who have particular needs
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Pain management and nursing care
  • Introduction
  • Pain
  • Pain assessment
  • Non-pharmacological approaches to pain relief
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Management and nursing care of gastro-intestinal symptoms
  • Introduction
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • What is nausea and vomiting?
  • Assessment
  • Management of nausea and vomiting
  • Nursing care
  • Malignant bowel obstruction
  • Constipation
  • Cachexia
  • Other gastrointestinal symptoms
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Management and nursing care of breathlessness and fatigue
  • Introduction
  • Breathlessness
  • What is breathlessness?
  • Assessment of breathlessness
  • Pharmacological Management of breathlessness
  • Nursing management
  • Fatigue
  • What is fatigue?
  • Assessment
  • Management of fatigue
  • Nursing care
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Management and nursing care of psychological symptoms
  • Introduction
  • Psychological concerns
  • Depression and Anxiety
  • Management and treatment of anxiety and depression
  • Sexuality
  • Assessing sexuality
  • Psychological care
  • Conclusion
  • Chapter 11: Caring for the family
  • Introduction
  • Defining the family
  • Role of the family in care giving
  • Effects of caring on the family
  • The needs of carers
  • Communicating with the family
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Palliative care emergencies
  • Introduction
  • Palliative care emergencies
  • Spinal cord compression
  • Superior vena cava obstruction (SVCO)
  • Hypercalcaemia
  • Conclusion
  • Chapter 13: Nursing care at end of life
  • Introduction
  • Recognising that a patient is dying
  • End of life care
  • Physical nursing care for the dying patient
  • Bronchial secretions (‘death rattle’)
  • Terminal restlessness
  • The syringe driver
  • Being with a dying patient
  • Nurse's role after death
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Loss grief and bereavement
  • Introduction
  • Coping With Loss
  • Common emotional responses to loss
  • Bereavement theories
  • Helping the bereaved
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Section III: Personal and professional development in palliative care
  • Chapter 15: Looking after yourself
  • Introduction
  • What is stress and why do we need to know about it?
  • Some of the reasons nursing is stressful
  • Effects of stress
  • Coping strategies
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Professional support
  • Introduction
  • Key people
  • Clinical supervision
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Learning from your practice through reflection
  • Introduction
  • Types of reflection
  • Why use reflective practice?
  • Starting your reflective practice
  • Conclusion
  • References