The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century

Editor/Author Osterhammel, Jurgen
Publication Year: 2014
Publisher: Princeton University Press

Single-User Purchase Price: $49.97
Unlimited-User Purchase Price: $74.95
ISBN: 978-0-69-114745-1
Category: History - World history
Image Count: 4
Book Status: Available
Table of Contents

A monumental history of the nineteenth century, The Transformation of the World offers a panoramic and multifaceted portrait of a world in transition. Jurgen Osterhammel, an eminent scholar who has been called the Braudel of the nineteenth century, moves beyond conventional Eurocentric and chronological accounts of the era, presenting instead a truly global history of breathtaking scope and towering erudition.

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Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • PART ONE: APPROACHES
  • I Memory and Self-Observation: The Perpetuation of the Nineteenth Century
  • 1 Visibility and Audibility
  • 2 Treasuries of Memory and Knowledge
  • 3 Observation, Description, Realism
  • 4 Numbers
  • 5 News
  • 6 Photography
  • II Time: When Was the Nineteenth Century?
  • 1 Chronology and the Coherence of the Age
  • 2 Calendar and Periodization
  • 3 Breaks and Transitions
  • 4 The Age of Revolution, Victorianism, Fin de Siècle
  • 5 Clocks and Acceleration
  • III Space: Where Was the Nineteenth Century?
  • 1 Space and Time
  • 2 Metageography: Naming Spaces
  • 3 Mental Maps: The Relativity of Spatial Perspective
  • 4 Spaces of Interaction: Land and Sea
  • 5 Ordering and Governing Space
  • 6 Territoriality, Diaspora, Borders
  • PART TWO: PANORAMAS
  • IV Mobilities
  • 1 Magnitudes and Tendencies
  • 2 Population Disasters and the Demographic Transition
  • 3 The Legacy of Early Modern Migrations: Creoles and Slaves
  • 4 Penal Colony and Exile
  • 5 Ethnic Cleansing
  • 6 Internal Migration and the Changing Slave Trade
  • 7 Migration and Capitalism
  • 8 Global Motives
  • V Living Standards: Risk and Security in Material Life
  • 1 The Standard of Living and the Quality of Life
  • 2 Life Expectancy and “Homo hygienicus”
  • 3 Medical Fears and Prevention
  • 4 Mobile Perils, Old and New
  • 5 Natural Disasters
  • 6 Famine
  • 7 Agricultural Revolutions
  • 8 Poverty and Wealth
  • 9 Globalized Consumption
  • VI Cities: European Models and Worldwide Creativity
  • 1 The City as Norm and Exception
  • 2 Urbanization and Urban Systems
  • 3 Between Deurbanization and Hypergrowth
  • 4 Specialized Cities, Universal Cities
  • 5 The Golden Age of Port Cities
  • 6 Colonial Cities, Treaty Ports, Imperial Metropolises
  • 7 Internal Spaces and Undergrounds
  • 8 Symbolism, Aesthetics, Planning
  • VII Frontiers: Subjugation of Space and Challenges to Nomadic Life
  • 1 Invasions and Frontier Processes
  • 2 The North American West
  • 3 South America and South Africa
  • 4 Eurasia
  • 5 Settler Colonialism
  • 6 The Conquest of Nature: Invasions of the Biosphere
  • VIII Imperial Systems and Nation-States: The Persistence of Empires
  • 1 Great-Power Politics and Imperial Expansion
  • 2 Paths to the Nation-State
  • 3 What Holds Empires Together?
  • 4 Empires: Typology and Comparisons
  • 5 Central and Marginal Cases
  • 6 Pax Britannica
  • 7 Living in Empires
  • IX International Orders, Wars, Transnational Movements: Between Two World Wars
  • 1 The Thorny Path to a Global System of States
  • 2 Spaces of Power and Hegemony
  • 3 Peaceful Europe, Wartorn Asia and Africa
  • 4 Diplomacy as Political Instrument and Intercultural Art
  • 5 Internationalisms and the Emergence of Universal Norms
  • X Revolutions: From Philadelphia via Nanjing to Saint Petersburg
  • 1 Revolutions—from Below, from Above, from Unexpected Directions
  • 2 The Revolutionary Atlantic
  • 3 The Great Turbulence in Midcentury
  • 4 Eurasian Revolutions, Fin de Siècle
  • XI The State: Minimal Government, Performances, and the Iron Cage
  • 1 Order and Communication: The State and the Political
  • 2 Reinventions of Monarchy
  • 3 Democracy
  • 4 Bureaucracies
  • 5 Mobilization and Discipline
  • 6 Self-Strengthening: The Politics of Peripheral Defensive
  • 7 State and Nationalism
  • PART THREE: THEMES
  • XII Energy and Industry: Who Unbound Prometheus, When, and Where?
  • 1 Industrialization
  • 2 Energy Regimes: The Century of Coal
  • 3 Paths of Economic Development and Nondevelopment
  • 4 Capitalism
  • XIII Labor: The Physical Basis of Culture
  • 1 The Weight of Rural Labor
  • 2 Factory, Construction Site, Office
  • 3 Toward Emancipation: Slaves, Serfs, Peasants
  • 4 The Asymmetry of Wage Labor
  • XIV Networks: Extension, Density, Holes
  • 1 Communications
  • 2 Trade
  • 3 Money and Finance
  • XV Hierarchies: The Vertical Dimension of Social Space
  • 1 Is a Global Social History Possible?
  • 2 Aristocracies in (Moderate) Decline
  • 3 Bourgeois and Quasi-bourgeois
  • XVI Knowledge: Growth, Concentration, Distribution
  • 1 World Languages
  • 2 Literacy and Schooling
  • 3 The University as a Cultural Export from Europe
  • 4 Mobility and Translation
  • 5 Humanities and the Study of the Other
  • XVII Civilization and Exclusion
  • 1 The “Civilized World” and Its “Mission”
  • 2 Slave Emancipation and White Supremacy
  • 3 Antiforeignism and “Race War”
  • 4 Anti-Semitism
  • XVIII Religion
  • 1 Concepts of Religion and the Religious
  • 2 Secularization
  • 3 Religion and Empire
  • 4 Reform and Renewal
  • Conclusion: The Nineteenth Century in History
  • 1 Self-Diagnostics
  • 2 Modernity
  • 3 Again: The Beginning or End of a Century
  • 4 Five Characteristics of the Century
  • Abbreviations
  • Bibliography